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Donald Trump insists he didn't mean anything anti-Semitic by his weekend tweet depicting Democratic rival Hillary Clinton alongside a six-point star and piles of $100 bills. Assuming that's true, it's yet another unforced error for the Trump campaign, in what's become an almost constant stream of errors, gaffes and other blunders.

President Obama told fans of Hillary Clinton in North Carolina he's ready to "pass the baton." He's hoping his political push will help Clinton across the finish line in the presidential relay race.

"I'm here today because I believe in Hillary Clinton," Obama told several thousand supporters at the convention center in Charlotte, N.C. "I want you to help elect her the next president of the United States of America."

No president has campaigned strongly for his chosen successor in at least 100 years.

Tuesday's event, with President Obama campaigning for Hillary Clinton, his former secretary of state and onetime rival, in North Carolina is remarkable for that reason. It kicks off what is likely to be a season of vigorous campaigning by the president.

There are reasons presidents haven't campaigned strongly for a successor — sometimes they're unpopular, some nominees try to distance, some presidents were in failing health.

Sen. Bernie Sanders went out of his way Sunday to find praise for the Democratic party's platform drafting committee, but there is one major sticking point: The Trans-Pacific Partnership.

Sanders wants the final platform to unequivocally oppose the free-trade deal that was negotiated by the Obama administration, saying it "threatens our democracy" in an op-ed published in The Philadelphia Inquirer on Sunday.

Updated at 8:40 p.m. ET

Vice President Joe Biden is confident that Bernie Sanders is going to endorse Hillary Clinton and that the Democratic party will unify.

"Oh, I've talked to Bernie, Bernie's going to endorse her, this is going to work out," Biden said in an interview with Rachel Martin, host of NPR's Weekend Edition. "The Democrats are coalescing even before this occurs."

Sanders was asked about Biden's comment in an interview with MSNBC on Thursday evening and said he wasn't quite ready to endorse Clinton.

As the presidential election nears, a number of important voting law cases are still up in the air. And that can be confusing — for voters trying to figure out what they do or don't need to cast their ballots, for election officials trying to figure out how to run elections, and for politicians trying to make sure supporters get out and vote.

Here's a brief guide on where some of the big cases stand, as of the end of June. More rulings are expected, although courts are reluctant to make major voting law changes too close to Election Day.

Donald Trump laid out his plan for the economy, criticizing globalization and policies that promote free trade, in a speech in Monessen, Pa., on Tuesday.

NPR's politics team has annotated Trump's speech. The portions we commented on are bolded, followed by analysis and fact check in italics. We will update further.

The speech follows:

Hillary Clinton laid out her economic plan on Monday at a rally in Cincinnati. She appeared with Sen. Elizabeth Warren, a hero to progressives who has stood up to bank executives and called for lower student debt.

NPR's politics team has annotated Clinton's portion of the speech below. Portions we commented on are in boldface, followed by analysis and fact check in italics.

The speech follows:

Emrah Gurel / AP Photo

In the aftermath of the attack on Ataturk international airport in Istanbul, Donald Trump sounded a harsh call for fighting terrorism, suggesting the response should be to “fight fire with fire.” Hillary Clinton’s response was more measured, focusing on solidarity between America and Turkey. Which approach will voters embrace?

Donald Trump celebrated voters' stunning decision in the United Kingdom to leave the European Union, while he marked the re-opening of his golf course and resort in Scotland.

Trump contended that the U.K. had "taken back their independence" and predicted similar populist, nativist movements throughout the Western world, like the one fueling his candidacy in the U.S.

A campaign putting out a list of big name endorsements isn't particularly remarkable. But what is remarkable about the Clinton campaign's list is that it includes prominent Republican executives — business leaders who say they have never voted for a Democratic presidential candidate in their lives.

Take Jim Cicconi, the senior executive vice president at AT&T. He served in both the Reagan and George H.W. Bush administrations and donated $10,000 last year to Jeb Bush's Right to Rise superPAC. But he says he's voting for Hillary Clinton in November.

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And we're going to turn now to my colleague Steve Inskeep, who is looking at the view of an election - an important vote in this country, which is coming in November. Steve, take it away.

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Sen. Marco Rubio announced Wednesday he will run for re-election to his Florida seat. The onetime Republican presidential candidate pledged not to run again but has reconsidered. The Florida seat is considered a competitive one for the GOP in an election cycle in which the party's control of the Senate could be in jeopardy.

Courtesy Rep. John Lewis

Donald Trump fired his campaign manager, his fundraising numbers are terrible, and his poll numbers are sinking. Trump is working to assure nervous Republicans, while Hillary Clinton hits Trump over his business experience. Clinton is also vetting possible running mates, and looking to win over Bernie Sanders supporters.

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This November's presidential election comes on the heels of a year of incomparable black activism.

Young activists are protesting in the streets, organizing on college campuses and disrupting campaign rallies to push for change in powerful ways.

You might expect this political energy to be reflected at the ballot box. But some activists, like Koya Graham, don't see much of a point in voting for president.

When Graham turned 18, the first thing she did was register to vote. And, year-after-year, she was a loyal voter — until this primary season.

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The week started off with big questions about Donald Trump's campaign, and they go on, especially now that we know how much money the Trump campaign has in the bank.

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Hillary Clinton delivered a stinging indictment Tuesday of both Donald Trump's business record and his economic policy prescriptions, an early effort to undermine what the business mogul has billed as one of his chief qualifications for the White House.

"We can't let him bankrupt America like we are one of his failed casinos," Clinton told supporters at an alternative high school in Columbus, Ohio. "We can't let him roll the dice with our children's futures."

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It's been a tough couple of weeks for the presumptive GOP nominee Donald Trump.

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