yemen

A Saudi-led blockade of Yemen continues to exacerbate a humanitarian crisis that aid groups are calling the most severe in decades.

The Trump administration is updating its travel ban, just hours before it was set to expire. In a proclamation signed by President Trump on Sunday, the travel restrictions now include eight countries, a couple of which are not majority-Muslim, as had been the case with all the nations in the original ban.

A top U.S. military official told the Senate Armed Services Committee on Thursday that he accepts "full responsibility" for the widely criticized U.S. ground raid into Yemen in late January.

At the same time, Gen. Joseph Votel, the head of U.S. Central Command, said he was "satisfied" after a review found that the tragic outcome of the raid was not a result of "incompetence or poor decision-making or poor judgment."

The Trump administration continued to play loose with facts in week three.

President Trump took aim at one of his favorite targets — the media — accusing them of not reporting terrorist attacks. The very list of attacks the White House released hours later contradicted those claims.

Trump again cited incorrect statistics on the country's murder rate, though a day later he did use the right numbers.

Press secretary Sean Spicer had his own "Bowling Green massacre" moment when he referred multiple times to a terrorist attack in Atlanta that never happened.

Barack Obama spent much of his tenure scaling back the high-profile "war on terror" he inherited from George W. Bush. In a few short days, President Trump has again set the U.S. on a more visible and confrontational course in dealing with the threat of terrorism.

Trump has temporarily frozen immigration from seven mostly Muslim countries, igniting protests outside the White House and at airports around the country.

The U.S. launched missiles at three radar installations in rebel-controlled areas of Yemen late Wednesday. It's the first time that the U.S. has carried out strikes against the Houthi rebels during the conflict in Yemen.

This comes after missiles were fired from Yemen's coast at U.S. Navy destroyer USS Mason on two separate occasions in four days.

The ship was able to deploy "defensive countermeasures," according to a statement from Pentagon press secretary Peter Cook, and there was "no damage to the ship or its crew."

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RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Throughout his tenure, President Obama has made it clear he has no appetite for involving the United States in another Middle East conflict. Yet the U.S. is bombing daily in Syria and Iraq. And in a separate conflict that's receiving far less attention, the U.S. is increasingly embroiled in Yemen.