wealth

sweet auburn atlanta housing house apartment street
Ken Lund / Flickr

Bloomberg recently analyzed cities with more than 250,000 people across the country and determined Atlanta is the worst city for income inequality in the United States. Its report states the median income in the city is $57,000.

That's compared to what the top 5 percent of residents make, which exceeds $637,000. This gap in income is determined by factors like affordable housing, wealth accumulation and Georgia's low minimum wage.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

You probably saw the photo. 

A woman with her right hand raised in a fist, her left on the autobiography of Malcolm X. That was Mariah Parker. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Chalk it up to the law of unintended consequences.

The Federal tax reform that passed this year was intended to provide tax relief. The perhaps unintended effect was a potentially massive disruption in one of the private solutions to public sector problems often beloved by Republicans and Democrats alike.

 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The latest in our Macon Conversations series: Meet Charise Stephens and Scott Mitchell. In their conversation, Charise and Scott tackle the challenges of overcoming the prejudice you are raised with.

 

 

Georgia Congressman Austin Scott (R GA-08) wants to end a program that offers subsidized, low cost cell phones.

Scott introduced the End Taxpayer Funded Cell Phones Act in late July. It would end an Obama era program which provides basic smart phone service to people with low incomes for $9.25 a month.

The demolition of the Tindall Heights housing project in Macon, and the relocation of its residents, provides a lens into the issue of affordable housing in the United States on the We Live Here podcast from St. Louis Public Radio. With reporting from Grant Blankenship of GPB Macon, Devin Katayama KQED in San Francisco and the We Live Here team from St. Louis Public Radio.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

Demolition formally began Monday in one of Macon’s oldest and largest public housing projects, Tindall Heights.

During a ceremony that could have looked like a groundbreaking from a distance, officials and politicians swung golden sledgehammers to break the first piece of the project’s red brick.

For longtime educator and former Bibb County School Board President,  Thelma Dillard, the day was bittersweet.

“I'm here today because I want to see the ending of my beginning,” she said.