water

Billy Birdwell / Army Corp of Engineers

After years of contentious debate, The Army Corp of Engineers has made their recommendation on how to replace an Augusta dam with something that will benefit an endangered fish.

The Corps of Engineers wants to replace the Savannah Bluff Lock and Dam with a pair of river width weirs that would allow the endangered shortnose sturgeon to reach spawning grounds it hasn’t used since 1937.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

A report from leading environmental advocates in Georgia describes how the toxins left over from burning coal for power are being stored by Georgia Power in direct contact with groundwater.  

  

The report from the Southern Environmental Law Center, the Chattahoochee Riverkeeper, The Altamaha Riverkeeper and the Coosa River Basin Initiative, and based on analysis of Georgia Power data, came one day before the only chance for Georgians to tell the federal Environmental Protection Agency what they think about plans to handle the management of those toxins, called coal ash, to Georgia’s Environmental Protection Division.   

 

 

Brian Lawdermilk/ AP Images for USA Swimming

Summer is officially weeks away, but there have already been tragedies reported in lakes, rivers and pools. Georgia officials are investigating two separate drownings at Lake Lanier that occured in less than 24 hours. Bibb County authorities say a man drowned in a Macon pool. Police confirm a teen drowned at a Buckhead Memorial Day pool party.

Drowning is one of the top three causes of unintentional deaths for people under 29.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that African American children between ages 5 and 14 are three times as likely to die from drowning than white children.


UGA Skidaway Institute of Oceanography

Microplastics are everywhere – from dryer lint to microbeads in face cleansers. Now scientists are looking at how these tiny particles impact Georgia waterways. 


Mike Gonzalez / Wikimedia Commons

Georgia's Water Coalition released it's second "Clean 13" report Wednesday. The report highlights groups or people working to improve Georgia’s water quality.


(AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser, File)

From GPB News, this is Political Rewind.  Today, a long-awaited decision from the United States Supreme Court in Florida’s fight with Georgia over water rights from the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers.  We’ll discuss what happens next in the fight. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The long awaited U.S. Supreme Court decision named no clear winner in the decades long dispute between Florida and Georgia over the Chattahoochee/Flint River Basin. 

In a decision handed down Wednesday, the court remanded the dispute back to the Special Master, or investigator, they appointed to get to the bottom of the water issues. 


Mike Gonzalez / Wikimedia Commons

Georgia has been at war with Alabama and Florida over tri-state water use for decades. More recently, Tennessee entered the mix

The legal dispute began in 1990, when Alabama and Florida sued Georgia and the Army Corps of Engineers (COE) over a COE recommendation that a dam on the Chattahoochee River be used to supply Atlanta with water, rather than the states of Florida and Alabama. 

 

Last week, Gov. Nathan Deal announced his pick for Deputy Commissioner for Rural Georgia. In January, GPB Special Correspondent Celeste Headlee looked at legislative efforts to improve services like health care and internet access in rural parts of the state. She spoke with Mark Niesse, a reporter with the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and Sharon Wright Austin, Political Science Professor at the University of Florida.

 

Grant Blankenship

When Hurricane Irma took out the power in Marshallville, Georgia, Monday, it took the water pump behind City Hall with it. 

Since then, the 1,500 or so residents of Marshallville have had no drinking water. Officials with Georgia's Environmental Protection Division said eight South Georgia water systems are under boil advisories with more to come soon. That's where Marshallville Chief of Police Ronald Jackson said the city finds itself now that the power is back on and the water is running.

On this episode, we discussed how thousands of Georgians were dropped from food stamp benefits this year – roughly 62 percent of the state’s recipients. The state told them they had an April 1 deadline to find a job, or lose their benefits. Melissa Johnson, Senior Policy Analyst for the Georgia Budget and Policy Institute; and Craig Schneider, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, joined us for that conversation.

 

Talia Crews / flickr

Lead was banned from plumbing decades ago, but as the crisis in Flint, Michigan shows, lead contamination lasts a long time. A new investigation into Georgia’s water systems finds they are not immune from lead contamination. We talked about the story with reporters Andy Miller of Georgia Health News and Brenda Goodman of WebMD.

Public Domain

Environmental advocates say Georgia’s water supplies could be at risk if Congress approves President Trump's proposal to cut $2.5 billion from the  Environmental Protection Agency’s budget.

If approved, the budget would slash the EPA's funding by 31 percent and lay off over 3,000 workers. 

Gil Rodgers is the director of the Georgia and Alabama offices of the Southern Environmental Law Center. He says the EPA plays a big role in protecting many facets of the state's environment. 

Georgia Wins Water Wars Case In Dispute With Florida

Feb 14, 2017
Kiezers / Wikimedia Commons

A special master appointed by the U.S. Supreme Court has sided with Georgia in the state’s long-running dispute with Florida over water rights in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River basin.

From severe droughts in Georgia to contaminated water in Flint, Michigan, we've seen the fragility of the nation's water supply tested. A power outage knocked two Atlanta pumping stations offline last weekend, turning what comes from the tap into a safety hazard. We  speak with Atlanta Department of Watershed Management Commissioner Jo Ann Macrina about efforts to expand the city's emergency water supply.

Kirk Jordan / flickr

Water has made a lot of headlines in the past year. Severe drought in the West, contaminated water in Flint, Michigan, and last weekend, a power outage knocked two Atlanta pumping stations offline. Right now, Atlanta has only about three days of raw water in reserve. That's about to change.