voting machines

Andrew Harnik / AP

One day after a ruling was issued that requires Georgia to ditch its outdated touchscreen voting machines in 2020, a group of voters asked a federal judge to block the state from replacing it with a new $107 million ballot-marking device system.

Thursday, U.S. District Court Judge Amy Totenberg ordered the state to move to a paper ballot-based voting system after this fall’s municipal elections and to pilot hand-marked paper ballot voting in some elections this fall.

The new system selected by the secretary of state’s office satisfies that first order, as Dominion Voting Systems’ Image Cast X BMD combines a touchscreen tablet with a printer to produce a paper-based summary of a voter’s selection with a QR code that is then scanned and stored.

Grant Blankenship/GPB

A federal judge has denied a request to move all of this fall’s municipal elections in Georgia away from “unsecure, unreliable and grossly outdated technology” and toward hand-marked paper ballots that are optically scanned and counted.

The order from U.S. District Court Judge Amy Totenberg Thursday also requires the state to cease using its direct-recording electronic voting machines after 2019 and expresses doubts about the state’s ability to roll out its new ballot-marking device system in time for the March 24, 2020, presidential primary election.

Andrew Harnik / AP

Georgia has awarded a massive contract to replace its outdated touchscreen direct-recording electronic voting machines to a new company offering ballot-marking devices with a paper component.

Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger announced Monday that Dominion Voting Systems will be the state's new vendor for elections, ditching current vendor Elections Systems & Software. 

Andrew Harnik / AP

We have an election date: Two days after county elections officials expressed concerns about the still-to-be-decided presidential preference primary date, the secretary of state's office announced that voters will head to the polls March 24, 2020. 

That date is just before the deadline for a new voting machine vendor to fully implement a new system across the state's 159 counties.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Georgia could be one of the last states to set its date for the 2020 presidential preference primary, which is one of the first elections to be held on a soon-to-be-selected new voting system. 

In years past, Georgia has joined a number of states in holding the presidential primary on the first Tuesday in March known as "Super Tuesday," or what then-Secretary of State Brian Kemp dubbed the "SEC primary" in 2016.

But this year elections officials are holding off on a date until the dust has settled on the procurement process to replace Georgia's 27,000 outdated direct-recording electronic voting machines. 


A federal judge is allowing a lawsuit challenging Georgia's current voting system to continue, even as the secretary of state's office is reviewing proposals to replace it. 

Judge Amy Totenberg denied the state's request to dismiss the case, brought by a group of election integrity advocates and concerned Georgia voters.

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

A lawsuit challenging Georgia's outdated voting machines and seeking statewide use of hand-marked paper ballots can move forward, a federal judge ruled Tuesday.

David Goldman / AP Photo

The Secretary of State's Office has released its Request for Proposals (RFP) to upgrade Georgia's 27,000 touchscreen direct-recording electronic voting machines. 

Gov. Brian Kemp still has to sign HB 316, which would make Georgia the only state in the country to conduct elections solely on touchscreen ballot-marking devices.

David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia election issues top our political news today. Despite concerns from citizen groups and cyber security experts, the Senate approved a new computerized voting system for the state, it now goes back to the House for a final vote.


Grant Blankenship/GPB

As the state Senate is set to vote on a sweeping elections bill that would authorize $150 million in spending to modernize Georgia’s touchscreen direct-recording electronic voting machines, the long-term cost of the proposed solution remains a point of contention.  

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

A bill that would upgrade Georgia’s voting machines is winding its way through the Georgia Senate after clearing the House earlier this week.

HB 316 calls for Georgia to purchase touchscreen ballot-marking devices with a paper component, and makes numerous changes to how election law deals with absentee voting, voter registration and how votes are tallied.

New Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger has been following the bill’s progress closely, testifying at many of the subcommittee and committee hearings. He says that county elections officials overwhelmingly support ballot-marking devices as the best option for voters, and he thinks so, too.

While the bill was being heard for the first time in a Senate subcommittee on Thursday, I sat down with Raffensperger to talk about the bill and the future of Georgia’s elections.

Read the transcript of our conversation below.

This week in Georgia politics was all about the state's voting system. Rep. Barry Fleming (R-Harlem) filed a bill that proposed changing the voting machines from touchscreens to a new ballot-marking device. The bill also suggests changes to absentee ballots and voter registration.

GPB's Stephen Fowler stopped by "On Second Thought" to discuss the voting changes.

 


Grant Blankenship/GPB

After three days and close to 10 hours of public testimony, a House committee passed a measure that would change Georgia's voting machines and modify state election laws. 


The official portrait of Gov. Nathan Deal and Mrs. Sandra Deal was unveiled at State Capitol on January 3, 2019.
Office of the Governor

On this edition of Political Rewind, in just two days, Nathan Deal turns over the keys to the office of governor to his successor, Brian Kemp. Our panel will look at the legacy of the outgoing governor and look ahead at what to expect in the Kemp Administration.

 

  • Proposed New Voting Machines Tested
  • Coca Cola Aquires Coffee Company
  • First Right Whale Calf Of Season 

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Lawmakers and laymen alike huddled around stacks of paper and gleaming touchscreens to test potential replacements for Georgia’s aging touchscreen digital voting machines at the Georgia Freight Depot in downtown Atlanta on Thursday. 


John Bazemore / The Associated Press

Security questions continue to swirl around Georgia’s electoral process. Lawmakers largely agree the state’s current touch-screen voting machines have to go. They don’t leave a paper trail, and some analysts worry they could be hacked. The question isn’t whether the machines need to be replaced – but how.

Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger during an election commisison meeting in Macon. On Wednesday, Raffensperger annonuced Georgia will hold its presidential primary on March 24, 2020.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp declares it’s time to set aside politics and govern for the good of all Georgians. Are Democrats ready to bury the hatchet after a brutal campaign?


Political Rewind: The Divide Over Medicaid

Sep 11, 2018

On this edition of Political Rewind, Stacey Abrams unveils a proposal she says will provide health care to the neediest Georgians.  The Kemp campaign says Abrams’ plan to expand Medicaid is a non-starter, but they have yet to announce how they’ll address a problem voters say is high on their list of priorities.


Political Rewind: The Final Hours

Jul 23, 2018
(AP Photos/Todd Kirkland, John Amis, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a furious final weekend of campaigning in the GOP governor’s race.


(AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Supreme Court issues a landmark ruling, siding with a baker who refused to make a gay couple’s wedding cake. It’s a narrowly argued decision, but it will have an impact here in Georgia and across the country.  Then, Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Casey Cagle have been polling voters to come up with strategies for how to win the governor’s mansion.  Meanwhile, Brian Kemp is promoting his own polls that show him neck-and-neck with Cagle for the GOP nomination.  Our panel looks at the latest news from the governor’s race.  Plus, could a federal court force Georgia election officials to scramble to provide paper ballots for the November elections?


(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal says he’ll support the legislative push to buy voting machines that leave a paper trail, but critics say the proposed fix won’t assure Georgians that their votes have been tallied accurately.  Also, a federal court has blocked a measure just signed into law that would make Mississippi’s abortion restrictions the toughest in the nation, and now one candidate for Georgia governor says he wants to take those laws and make them even tougher here.  Plus, a number of Democrats running for Georgia GOP congressional seats are pledging to vote again

On this edition of Political Rewind, a surprise at the State Capitol: a hate-crimes bill is suddenly re-introduced.  Can it pass the legislature and become law?  Also, qualifying for the 2018 Georgia elections ends and candidates across the ballot are now in place.  Our panel weighs in on the surprise, the trends and the races likely to be in the spotlight.  In news from the state legislature, a measure to fund voting machines that leave a paper trail moves forward while progress to expand the legal rights of victims of childhood sexual abuse may not.  And, it’s been quite a news day involv

On this edition of Political Rewind, big issues bubbling up at the state capitol: legislators renew their interest in state oversight of Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport and a  possible return of paper balloting across Georgia.