Voter Suppression

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

The Atlanta Democrat began her remarks with a tongue-in-cheek disclaimer: “My name is Stacey Abrams and I am not the governor of Georgia.” 

 

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Georgia saw record turnout for the November midterms, but, as the state heads into runoff elections on Tuesday, early voting numbers are weak, especially among minorities.

“On Second Thought” invited Adrienne Jones to speak about the upcoming runoff election and voting issues. Jones is a political science assistant professor at Morehouse College. Ari Berman from Mother Jones also joined the conversation.


Today on the show, we explored the history of voter suppression and lynching victims in Georgia. We also heard from filmmakers and organizers from the Fifty Foot Film Festival about homegrown horror and sci-fi films.

We spoke to ProPublica's Jessica Huseman and Savannah State's Allynne Owens about the history of voter suppression and how to spot it as citizens today. Huseman oversees the collaborative reporting project called Electionland, which reports on election issues across the country.

We also spoke with Catherine Meeks from The Absalom Jones Center for Racial Healing about the ceremony remembering lynching victims in Georgia this Friday. Historian and author Anthony Pitch also joined the conversation. He wrote "The Last Lynching: How A Gruessome Mass Murder Rocked A Small Georgia Town."

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Early voting ends this Friday in Georgia. Accusations of voter suppression have landed Georgia in the national spotlight.

 

Secretary of State Brian Kemp's office faces multiple lawsuits for rejecting voter applications. Last week, a judge ruled state elections officials cannot reject absentee mail-in ballots if signatures do not match those on file.

 

We spoke to ProPublica's Jessica Huseman and Savannah State's Allynne Owens about the history of voter suppression and how to spot it as citizens today.

Andrew Harnik / AP

On this Podcast Edition of Political Rewind, GPB Reporter Stephen Fowler breaks down all of the lawsuits, controversies and provides context surrounding allegations of voter suppression. 

Have you encountered problems voting during the elections? Send us a tip here or text VOTE to 81380.

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A voter enters a polling site in Atlanta, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017.
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On this edition of Political Rewind, the Secretary of State’s office claims there will be chaos at Georgia voting locations if a federal judge orders the state to switch to paper ballots. We look at the arguments from both sides of the aisle concerning the security of Georgia’s voting machines ahead of the November 6 election.


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On this edition of Political Rewind, in a matchup between Delta Airlines and the NRA, it’s no contest: GOP legislators pass a tax break that saves Georgian millions, but denies Delta a cut worth $40 million.  We’ll look at the long-range consequences of the battle.  Plus, thousands of gun safety advocates rallied at the State Capitol last month, but their voices were silenced by an official who made sure the microphones at the state facility were turned off.  Also, a Columbus state senator pushes a bill to force the city of Atlanta to shorten the hours of city polling places, leading critic

Black Georgia Lawmakers Blast Trump Panel On Voting Fraud

Jul 6, 2017
Andrew Harnik / AP

Black lawmakers in Georgia blasted President Donald Trump's election fraud commission for requesting extensive personal voter information Thursday, accusing the administration of trying to scare people away from voting.

Members of Georgia's Legislative Black Caucus, all Democrats in the General Assembly, said there's no logical reason the federal government would ask states for the information. They said releasing it would violate voters' privacy.

Vice President Pence has yet to begin a promised investigation into allegations by President Trump that millions of people voted illegally in November. But that hasn't stopped state lawmakers from taking action they say would limit voter fraud, even though the president's claims have been widely discredited.

Legislation to tighten voter ID and other requirements has already been introduced in about half the states this year. And in statehouse after statehouse, the debate has had a familiar ring.

The words were those of Coretta Scott King, widow of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.

But they resulted in a rarely invoked Senate rule being used to formally silence Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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Voter suppression and intimidation is a very real issue in Georgia. We talk with Kristina Torres of the Atlanta Journal-Constitution about the most recent and shocking examples from across the state. We also bring on University of Georgia Professor Charles Bullock to provide context and discuss the implications of voter intimidation.