voter fraud

Political Rewind: The Final Hours

Jul 23, 2018
(AP Photos/Todd Kirkland, John Amis, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a furious final weekend of campaigning in the GOP governor’s race.


(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor Deal says he’ll support the legislative push to buy voting machines that leave a paper trail, but critics say the proposed fix won’t assure Georgians that their votes have been tallied accurately.  Also, a federal court has blocked a measure just signed into law that would make Mississippi’s abortion restrictions the toughest in the nation, and now one candidate for Georgia governor says he wants to take those laws and make them even tougher here.  Plus, a number of Democrats running for Georgia GOP congressional seats are pledging to vote again

On this edition of Political Rewind, qualifying for every race on the Georgia ballot begins today, and for the first time in recent memory, newly energized Democrats are looking to challenge GOP supremacy in the state legislature and in statewide offices.  Plus, Secretary of State Brian Kemp is bowing to pressure to change what the ACLU calls misleading voter registration forms.  Will questions about the integrity of Georgia elections hamper Kemp in his race for governor? 

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

On Tuesday Atlantans voted for a new mayor and other important city positions. We analyze election day results with Andra Gillespie, Professor of Political Science at Emory University. And Greg Bluestein, Political Reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

The work of President Trump's commission studying voter fraud and other voting problems has been stalled by the eight lawsuits filed against it, according to one commission member.

Indiana's Republican Secretary of State Connie Lawson says the suits, which seek release of all of the commission's correspondence, among other things, have had a "chilling" effect.

Some Democrats on the 11-member panel have complained in recent weeks that they're being kept in the dark about its activities and plans.

First, the battle for voter data is reaching a tipping point in Georgia. Last week, a lawsuit filed in Fulton County Superior Court seeks to overturn the results of the 6th District congressional election, alleging a voter data breach at an election center at Kennesaw State University influenced the outcome. And a new restraining order is looking to bar President Trump from obtaining voter information in Georgia. We talk about these issues with Kristina Torres, reporter for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

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President Trump has created a commission to investigate voter fraud. Most states are refusing to hand over their registration records. But Georgia’s leadership has agreed to release extensive personal information about voters here. Blogger Sam Burnham takes issue with this. He brings us this commentary.

A letter from Kris Kobach, the vice chairman of a White House commission looking into voter fraud and other irregularities, is drawing fire from some state election officials. The letter, sent Wednesday to all 50 states, requests that all publicly available voter roll data be sent to the White House by July 14, five days before the panel's first meeting.

You might be asking yourself, whatever happened to Vice President Mike Pence's investigation into President Trump's claim that millions of people voted illegally in November? It's been over a month since the president said he would ask Pence to lead a "major investigation" into those claims and the overall issue of voter fraud.

Vice President Pence has yet to begin a promised investigation into allegations by President Trump that millions of people voted illegally in November. But that hasn't stopped state lawmakers from taking action they say would limit voter fraud, even though the president's claims have been widely discredited.

Legislation to tighten voter ID and other requirements has already been introduced in about half the states this year. And in statehouse after statehouse, the debate has had a familiar ring.

WIKIPEDIA COMMONS / Creative Commons

Attorneys on both sides of a high-profile case of what was alleged to be voter fraud in Georgia say they have agreed those charges were unfounded.

In the lead up to a contentious local election in 2015, sheriff’s deputies in Hancock County ­– 100 miles east of Atlanta – knocked on doors checking to see if voters were living where their drivers’ licenses said they did. The board of elections identified 180 voters, mostly African-American, who were mismatched and accused them of voter fraud.

After out-of-court mediation, an agreement issued this week refutes that. 

Early Saturday morning, President Trump launched into one of his favorite pastimes — tweeting allegations with no evidence to back them up.

His latest unfounded claims: an assertion that President Barack Obama ordered wiretapping of Trump Tower during last year's elections. He accused his predecessor of "McCarthyism" and being a "bad (or sick) guy."

White House adviser Stephen Miller doubled down on the Trump administration's groundless claims of voter fraud in New Hampshire — and across the nation — during in an interview on ABC's This Week on Sunday.

Earlier this week President Trump claimed, with no evidence, that voters from Massachusetts were bused to New Hampshire to vote illegally.

The Trump administration continued to play loose with facts in week three.

President Trump took aim at one of his favorite targets — the media — accusing them of not reporting terrorist attacks. The very list of attacks the White House released hours later contradicted those claims.

Trump again cited incorrect statistics on the country's murder rate, though a day later he did use the right numbers.

Press secretary Sean Spicer had his own "Bowling Green massacre" moment when he referred multiple times to a terrorist attack in Atlanta that never happened.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

FLICKR

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump has claimed on multiple occasions that the election is rigged against him. But can a national presidential election actually be rigged against a single candidate or party?

We speak with Emory University law professor Michael Kang about mistrust in the voting system and whether voters should be concerned.

David Goldman / The Associated Press

A new report by the non-partisan journalism project News21 found voter fraud that could be prevented by tougher voter ID laws is not widespread. Hundreds of allegations of voter fraud over the last few years were reviewed in five states, including Georgia, and found none of the prosecuted cases involved voter impersonation.