Veterans Affairs

VA Announces Renewed Focus On Mental Health Outreach

Jun 24, 2019

Garrett Cathcart of Atlanta waited six years after the end of his active duty military service to step into a therapist’s office.

 

He says his military training taught him to be “alpha” and “macho,” which discouraged him from expressing emotional vulnerability.

“The Army...does an amazing job of creating a soldier,” Cathcart said, “not so hot on taking a soldier and turning him back into a civilian.”

 

Veterans Affairs wants to change that going forward.

Rep. Lucy McBath speaks outside of the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Atlanta, GA with House Veterans’ Affairs Chairman Mark Takano and Georgia veterans.
Robert Jimison / GPB

Two veterans in Georgia died by suicide last month, one outside the entrance of the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center and another in the parking lot of the VA Hospital in Dublin. The two incidences punctuated the struggles that have plagued the Georgia facilities in recent years. 


(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, a weight is lifted from Johnny Isakson’s back: President Trump’s embattled personal doctor, Ronny Jackson, withdraws his name from consideration of VA Secretary.  Isakson was unhappy with Trump’s choice from the very beginning.  Then, Republican State House incumbent Betty Price draws a well-known challenger in her primary race.  Have her many controversial statements made her vulnerable?  Plus, a middle Georgia school district becomes the first in the state to authorize some of its teachers to carry guns in the classroom.  Will more districts follow?

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, President Trump sends mixed signals about his support for  his embattled nominee to head the Veterans’ Administration.  Now, Georgia’s Johnny Isakson holds a key to the fate of Dr.

Crystal Hernandez

Federal data show the suicide rate among veterans has risen over the last decade. In 2007, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs approached this problem with a 24-hour call center in upstate New York.

How Will Proposed Trump Budget Affect Georgia?

Mar 16, 2017
Evan Vucci / AP Photo

The Trump administration unveiled its proposed 2018 budget Thursday morning. Unsurprisingly, the budget calls for significant increases in military and border security spending while dramatically reducing the funding for a number of other government agencies.

Several of those cuts, including reductions at the Department of Health and Human Services, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting will affect a variety of Georgia-based programs that receive federal funding.