U.S. military

Leighton Rowell / GPB News

According to the Women Veterans Office, there are over 93,000 women veterans in Georgia. Women veterans are often invisible as a population because American society perceives veterans as predominantly men.

 

We spoke to Veda Brooks, director of the Women Veterans Office in the Georgia Department of Veteran Services. She discussed challenges women veterans face in finding jobs and translating their military experience to civilian positions.

 

BriGette McCoy also joined the conversation. She is the vice chair of the City of Atlanta's Veterans Affairs Commission and CEO of Women Veteran Social Justice Network. She discussed her experiences with military sexual trauma and working as an advocate for service members.

 

Courtesy Kentucky National Guard

World War I, which ended with an armistice agreement 100 years ago, transformed life in the United States. The "war to end all wars" also introduced a new chapter in African-Americans' fight for equal rights. About one million African-Americans registered for the draft and nearly 370,000 African-Americans enlisted in the U.S. military during World War I. Along with the activist W.E.B. Du Bois, many of those who served hoped that a war fought in the name of democracy would, at its end, make American society truly democratic as well.

David Davis, a professor of English at Mercer University, spoke with us about the atmosphere African-Americans met overseas in the war and the environment to which they returned after the armistice. 


Women Get Chance To 'One-Up' The Men In Mixed Infantry Units

Nov 27, 2017
John Bazemore / AP Photo

The young Army infantry recruits lined up in full combat gear, guns at the ready. At the signal, a soldier in front kicked in the door and they burst into the room, swiveling to check around the walls for threats.

"You're dead!" one would-be enemy yelled out from a dark corner, the voice slightly higher than the others echoing through the building.

It was 18-year-old Kirsten, training at Fort Benning, Georgia, to become one of the Army's first women serving as infantry soldiers.

Updated Monday, Oct. 23 at 6:08 p.m. ET

When backed into a corner, President Trump digs in and fights back.

It's what he's done as president, it's what he did as a candidate and it's what he did as a businessman.

Myeshia Johnson, the widow of Army Sgt. La David Johnson, one of the four U.S. soldiers killed in a military operation in Niger on Oct. 4, told ABC's Good Morning America that President Trump "made me cry even worse" when he called to offer condolences last week.

The phone call between the president and Johnson has been a source of controversy for a week now, since Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Fla., who listened in on the call, revealed details of the conversation.

Defense Secretary Jim Mattis is leaving an Obama-era policy on transgender military service members largely intact, saying he needs input from an expert panel to determine the best way to implement President Trump's ban that would keep transgender people from serving in the U.S. military.

Trump barred transgender would-be recruits from signing up, but he gave Mattis discretion to decide the status of transgender people who are already serving.

Transgender members of the U.S. military would be subject to removal at Defense Secretary James Mattis' discretion — and the service would bar transgender people from enlisting, under new White House guidelines for the Pentagon. President Trump announced the ban via a tweet last month.

Rough details of the guidelines were confirmed by NPR's Tom Bowman after the White House plan for the Pentagon was reported by The Wall Street Journal.