UGA

Courtesy of University of Georgia

The song "Daisy Bell" wasn't a hit in 1961, but it was a triumph. The singer? The IBM 7094, the largest, most expensive computer available at the time. And thanks to James Carmon, professor in the University of Georgia's School of Agriculture, the school purchased one in 1964.

 

Not only could the computer sing, it helped put man on the moon.

 

Special Event Puts Moon Rocks On Display At UGA's Russell Library

19 hours ago
Richard B. Russell Library and The Capitol Collection

The University of Georgia's Richard B. Russell Library is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the moon landing with an exhibit of rare items collected during the Apollo 11 mission. The collection includes the Georgia state flag, which traveled to the moon on the Apollo 11 spacecraft. Part of a spaceship is also on view.

On Tuesday, visitors can see the star of the show: a rock.  Specifically, it's a moon rock, which was given to the state of Georgia in 1972.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The University of Georgia continues to grapple with a difficult chapter of its history. It’s been under fire for how it handled the discovery of human remains under a school building during renovations. They appear to belong to people who were enslaved.

The growing tension recently erupted in protests. Demonstrators want reparations for descendants of slaves who built the university, including financial support for university staff and students as well as acknowledgment of the school’s history publicly and within the classroom.

GPB reporter Grant Blankenship went to Athens to witness the protests, and he talks with On Second Thought about what he found.


Leighton Rowell / GPB

Town and gown tensions are high at the University of Georgia as the end of the school year nears. Amid national conversations about the historical role of U.S. colleges and universities in slavery, community leaders and a group of faculty are calling on UGA to do more to address its own slave past.

But in a letter to the editor of UGA's student newspaperThe Red & Black, UGA President Jere Morehead said the university had "carefully considered all aspects" of a memorial constructed in 2018 to recognize and honor the legacy of individuals who were enslaved in Athens during the 19th Century.


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Chadwick Boseman, Oprah Winfrey and Spike Lee are all graduates of historically black colleges and universities. For more than a century, HBCUs provided the foundation for countless dynamic and influential leaders. Now, some academic finance experts predict that a quarter of those schools could be gone within 20 years.


Mary Frances Early UGA Black African-American Graduate
University of Georgia / Twitter

Mary Frances Early is a trailblazer. While Charlayne Hunter-Gault and Hamilton Holmes were the first African-Americans admitted to University of Georgia as undergrads in 1961, Early was the first to graduate. She earned a master's degree in music education.

Last week, UGA announced an initiative to name its College of Education after Early. Last year, when UGA was celebrating 100 years of education groundbreaking women, On Second Thought spoke with Early about her experiences as the first African-American student to graduate from the Georgia college. We hear that conversation.

Kimberly Vardeman / Wikimedia Commons

Wednesday marks six months since Hurricane Michael blew through parts of south Georgia. With planting season just a few weeks away, Georgia cotton growers are keeping an eye on the weather. 

 


Owner-submitted photo, via University of Georgia

A partnership between a hospital and a veterinary clinic is lowering the cost of life-saving operations for animals.


Christiane Amanpour has been with CNN almost as long as the network has existed. She's covered the Gulf War, Bosnian War and Arab Spring. Amanpour moved to Atlanta in 1983 when she was hired by CNN as an entry-level desk assistant. She worked her way up to become chief international anchor for the international network.  

Armanpour was recently in Atlanta to accept her award in the Atlanta Press Club Hall of Fame. "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott met up with Amanpour before the ceremony and asked her about career as an international journalist.


Butch Dill / Associated Press

This weekend the University of Georgia Bulldogs and Alabama Crimson Tide face off in Atlanta at Mercedes-Benz Stadium in another championship game. 

This weekend's game has major College Football Playoff implications and is a sold-out affair. On Monday, the SEC issued a warning telling fans and potential game goers to keep an eye out for counterfeit and stolen tickets. 


Flickr/Amanda Wood

First-time voters have shown up in record numbers in this midterm election. A national poll shows Georgia voter turnout is up 476 percent among 18 to 29-year-olds. 


Today on the show, we explored the complicated traditions of place and space with Guardian Atlanta Week, Sonny Seiler and Anthony Ray Hinton.

We viewed Atlanta through the eyes of The Guardian, a UK-based newspaper, which spent a week in the city for Guardian Atlanta Week.

We heard from Sonny Seiler on the origins of University of Georgia's famous mascot, Uga. He also discussed his legacy as a Savannah lawyer, captured by the famous book, "Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil."


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Attorney Sonny Seiler is that rare local celebrity with two entirely different claims to fame.  He was the real-life attorney featured in the book and movie “Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil,” and he and his family have been raising the University of Georgia mascots for decades.  He unraveled both tales for “On Second Thought” host Virginia Prescott during her visit to his long-time family home in Savannah.


Mary Frances Early UGA Black African-American Graduate
University of Georgia / Twitter

The first class of women graduated from the University of Georgia in 1918, one hundred years ago. Their resiliency changed higher education, but they were segregated.

 

UGA admitted the first black woman, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, in 1961. She inspired Mary Frances Early to attend the school a year later, and Early became the first black UGA graduate. She graduated in 1962 with a master's degree in music education.

 

We spoke to her about the barriers she faced in admission, the isolation of being the only black student on campus, and the way her legacy inspires students today.

 


EatingInsectsAthens.com

There’s a conference happening in Athens, and its name tells you all you need to know: Eating Insects.  Members of the North American Coalition for Insects in Agriculture, scientists, chefs and others will discuss everything from the latest recipes to the ethics of eating bugs. 


atlantaga.gov

  • UGA Lands Nearly $1m In Agriculture Research Grants From USDA
  • Roswell Officers Fired In Wake Of 'Coin Flip' Arrest Decision
  • Shorebird Population Boom On Jekyll Island

  • The Latest on The Atlanta Mayor's Race
  • The "DAWGS" Vie For The National Championship 
  • State Sen Rick Jeffares Resigns

  • Atlanta Mayor's Race in Final Hours
  • UGA Heads to College Football Playoffs
  • Illegal Tire Dump in DeKalb State Park
  • Jeffares Resigns From State Senate

wall street.com

Students leave more than 3 billion dollars, yes that's BILLION, in federal grants on the table each year! In this episode the Nothing Funny About Money Team discusses the various opportunities available for funding college, without going into debt!

What It Means To Be 'Far-Right'

Nov 1, 2017
Rio Gandara/Helsingin Sanomat

The terms “alt-right,” “far-right,” and “radical right” get thrown around a lot these days. But there’s actually very little research on what those terms mean and who the people are identifying with them. Cas Mudde, Professor in the Department of International Affairs at UGA, is looking to change that. His new book is “The Far-Right in America.” He joins us to analyze the movement and its many subsets.

UGA College of Ag & Environmental Sciences - OCCS

On September 30, a rape allegedly occurred on the campus of the University of Georgia in Athens. Afterwards, students received no timely notifications or information from UGA officials. Of the 15 reported rapes on campus last year, students were only notified of two of them quickly.

Experts: Opioid Crisis Is Hitting Georgia Especially Hard

Oct 23, 2017
johnofhammond / Flickr/CC

The nation's deepening opioid epidemic is hitting Georgia harder than most states, experts say.

That's one of the messages that came out of a recent conference at the University of Georgia.

Some of the highest opioid use is in the Rust Belt and the Southeast, authorities said.

On Second Thought For Tuesday, October 17, 2017

Oct 17, 2017

A new novel by Atlanta-based author Nic Stone explores police violence against people of color through the eyes of a teenage boy. He tries to make sense of contemporary racism using the teachings of Martin Luther King Jr., asking if those teachings still hold up. “Dear Martin” is out today, Oct. 17. The book launches with an event tonight at The National Center for Human and Civil Rights in Atlanta. Author Nic Stone joins us live in the studio.

Georgia’s campus carry law allows firearms on all public college campuses, minus a few excepted spaces. We hear about the research into the effectiveness of such laws with Matthew Boedy, a Professor of English at the University of North Georgia. Also Mark Rosenberg, former President and CEO of the Task Force for Global Health.

Our Nothing Funny About Money Team continues the discussion about Money and children. This is part two in the extended segment on Money and Kids.

About 30 years ago, the “Brotherman” comic series paved the way for today’s black comics and superhero movement. Atlanta-based artist Dawud Anyabwile is the co-creator of Brotherman. We talk with him about a new exhibit in Atlanta chronicling Brotherman’s universe.

Better Georgia

Last week, President Trump revoked another Obama-era Executive Order. This one required projects built with federal aid be designed to handle sea level rise due to climate change. We talk about how the scientific community is responding to climate change denial by the White House with Peter Dykstra of Environmental Health News. We also hear from Matt Hauer, a UGA demographer researching how sea level rise will drive coastal-dwelling Georgians inland.

In the Breakroom this week we’ll talk about microchips, atheists, and disgruntled Google employees. Plus, we’ll discuss the ethics of getting an A for effort. Joining us this week: Kathy Lohr, Christian Zsilavetz, Amy Condon, and Steve Brown.

Money And Kids

Aug 7, 2017

This month, Matt and Michael dive into the often controversial and challenging topic of "kids and money", not just the expense of having kids but teaching them the important issues associated with managing resources. Our hosts, found this topic actually required more than 30 minutes to discuss, so this is part one of two.

Pixabay

A recent report puts Georgia 41st in the nation for its quality of senior health. According to America’s Health Rankings Senior Report, that’s two slots lower than last year. We talk about senior health in the state with Kathy Floyd of the Georgia Council on Aging and Glenn Osster of the Institute of Gerontology at the University of Georgia.

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