Turkey

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Kurds are evacuating their traditional homeland in Northeast Syria during a five-day brokered pause in hostility. This pause in military action is set to end today, Oct. 22.

The situation is complicated, violent and unfolding on the other side of the world, but Americans are following the events closely.


Turkey’s pause in military operations in Syria ends Tuesday. The horrors happening to Kurds are unfolding on the other side of the world. Find out why Georgians are following it closely. Hear from Dr. Heval Kelli, a cardiologist and Syrian-born Georgian, and Timothy Head, the executive director of the Faith and Freedom Coalition.


Christopher Patey

Susan Rice has been called a lot of names. She was nicknamed "Spo" as a child, for her sporting athletic abilities. President Barack Obama labeled her one of three "Furies" on his national security team. One TV commentator called her "the right's favorite chew-toy," following her now infamous round of TV talk shows days after the attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Benghazi, Libya.

Just this weekend, President Donald Trump tweeted that Rice was a "disaster" for her role in the Obama administration's Syria policy. And, as we learn in her new autobiography, Tough Love: My Story of the Things Worth Fighting For, she has been called worse.


Cost Of Thanksgiving Dinner Lowest Since 2010

Nov 20, 2018
Thanksgiving turkey
National Turkey Federation

Americans will be spending less on their Thanksgiving meal this year. The cost is down for the third year in a row.


President Trump told the leader of Turkey that he has instructed U.S. generals to stop supplying arms to Kurdish fighters in Syria, according to Turkey's foreign minister.

Turkey's foreign minister, Mevlut Cavusoglu, spoke with reporters Friday following a phone call between Trump and Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

In a statement about the call, the White House did not confirm Cavusoglu's remarks about the Kurds, but it could have been alluding to a shift when it said:

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Behind many great recipes, you’ll find stories of immigration. That’s certainly the case in the kitchen of Pati Jinich. Her grandparents immigrated from Poland to Mexico. Now, Pati is a chef and cookbook author, renowned for her Jewish-Mexican fare. GPB’s Emily Cureton caught up with her last week while she was cooking at the General Muir restaurant in Atlanta.

Judging by public statements, U.S.-Turkey relations are going to be just fine.

President Trump hosted Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan on Tuesday afternoon, and both men had warm messages to share even after the two countries clashed last week over a decision by the United States to arm Kurdish fighters in Syria.

Trump spent much of his statement complimenting the Turkish military.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan is visiting the White House on Tuesday, looking for a "new beginning" to U.S.-Turkey relations, even as the two countries clash over the Trump administration's decision to arm Kurdish forces in Syria.

U.S. military officials view the Kurds there as key in the fight against ISIS, but the Turkish government argues they're terrorists.

Turkey's Prime Minister Binali Yildirim declared victory in the referendum bid to convert Turkey from a parliamentary to a strong president system of government.

The historic referendum, which passed by a narrow margin, grants more power to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who promised when he was elected in 2014 to be a "different kind of president."

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After more than two weeks, a manhunt in Turkey is over. Overnight, police captured the main suspect in a deadly attack at an Istanbul nightclub. The suspect is described as a native of Uzbekistan and a supporter of ISIS.

Istanbul Governor Vasip Sahin told reporters Tuesday morning that the suspect in the attack on the city's Reina nightclub has confessed.

Sahin identified the suspect as Abdulgadir Masharipov, born in 1983, a national of the Central Asian country of Uzbekistan.

"The terrorist has admitted to his crime, and his fingerprints also matched those found on the scene," Sahin said.

Sahin said there are strong indications Masharipov was acting on behalf of the Islamic State and had entered Turkey illegally on its eastern border.

Updated at 1 p.m. ET

Turkish authorities made multiple arrests Tuesday as they search for the person who attacked an Istanbul nightclub in the early hours of New Year's Day, killing at least 39 people.

A lone gunman shot his way into the Reina nightclub, which was packed with holiday revelers.

Tuesday was supposed to be a day of triumph for Russian diplomacy, when Russia aimed to replace the United States as the indispensable power in the Middle East. Instead, it became a day of mourning, with a Turkish honor guard in Ankara loading the flag-draped coffin of Russian Ambassador Andrei Karlov onto a Moscow-bound plane.

Turkey and Russia have launched a joint investigation into the assassination of Russia's ambassador to Turkey at the opening of a photo exhibit in the capital, Ankara, on Monday.

The ambassador, Andrei Karlov, was gunned down as he gave a speech at an art gallery. Turkey has identified the attacker as Mevlut Mert Altintas, a 22-year-old riot police officer, who shouted to the crowd, "Don't forget Aleppo! Don't forget Syria!" He was killed by Turkish special forces at the scene.

When Turkish officials visited Washington this week, one of their first stops was the Justice Department. They are trying to make the case that the U.S. should extradite a key suspect in last month's failed coup attempt.

Following those talks with the Justice Department, three Turkish lawmakers had tough words about Fethullah Gulen, the aging cleric who lives in rural eastern Pennsylvania and whose followers have been rounded up in Turkey in the wake of the coup.

Turkey abolished capital punishment in 2004. But in the wake of last month's failed coup, Turks have been demanding it be reinstated for the coup plotters. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has encouraged parliament to consider such a move, saying the public will cannot be ignored.

Legal experts say applying a death sentence retroactively is problematic. European officials say a return to capital punishment would kill Turkey's bid to join the EU. But that hasn't checked a surge in public calls to bring it back.

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Three years ago, Egypt's military carried out a swift and successful coup, ousting a conservative Muslim ruler and party that had been elected. A part of Turkey's armed forces attempted a very similar overthrow on July 15.

In both countries, the two most populous in the region, democracy suffered a setback in the wake of the military actions.

The parallels mostly end there.

Turkey has detained thousands of people in the wake of a failed coup attempt earlier this month. Now, Amnesty International reports that it has evidence that some detainees in Istanbul and the capital Ankara have been subjected to torture and rape.

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Turks survived a chaotic and bloody attempted military takeover on Friday that left more than 260 dead. Since then, the government has suspended thousands of public and private sector employees — everyone from teachers to police officers. Meanwhile, the parliament has ratified a state of emergency that will last up to three months. President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says it's necessary to protect democracy. But many Turks are afraid of what's to come.

After surviving a coup attempt that left more than 240 people dead and some 1,500 wounded, Turks are now living under a state of emergency that will last at least three months. Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan announced the emergency measures Wednesday night, promising to "cleanse" both the military and the government.

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Turkey's government says it is removing from government institutions anyone it considers loyal to Fethullah Gulen, an elderly Turkish cleric who has been living in eastern Pennsylvania since the late 1990s.

Turkish officials are blaming Gulen, who has a large following inside and outside Turkey, for a failed coup last Friday, an accusation Gulen denies.

Meanwhile, the broadcasting licenses for at least two dozen Turkish radio and TV stations have been canceled for alleged links to Gulen, whose extradition Turkey says it will seek from the United States.

Days after a failed coup, Turkey has asked the U.S. to extradite a cleric it accuses of inciting the takeover attempt. The request comes as the Turkish government has extended a crackdown to the Education Ministry, dismissing more than 15,000 people, state media report.

The White House confirmed receiving electronic materials Tuesday for the extradition of Fethullah Gulen, who has resided in Pennsylvania since the 1990s, according to the Associated Press.

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Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET on July 18.

Turkey's justice minister says that some 6,000 people have been detained following a failed coup attempt.

That includes some 3,000 military personnel detained in bases around the country, as NPR's Leila Fadel tells Weekend Edition Sunday.

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Who Is Behind The Coup In Turkey?

Jul 16, 2016

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