Troy Davis

A new GPB radio drama and podcast called "Beyond Reasonable Doubt: The Troy Davis Project" reflects the conflicting public discourse surrounding the Troy Davis case.

We spoke with playwright Lee Nowell on her 2016 play adapted for radio listeners. We also spoke with former Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Rhonda Cook and the Marshall Project staff writer Maurice Chammah to learn more about the death penalty and execution process in Georgia.

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

A new GPB radio drama and podcast called "Beyond Reasonable Doubt: The Troy Davis Project" reflects the conflicting public discourse that surrounded the Troy Davis case. Davis was convicted of murder and executed in Georgia.

 

We spoke with former Atlanta Journal-Constitution reporter Rhonda Cook and the Marshall Project staff writer Maurice Chammah to learn more about the death penalty and execution process in Georgia.

 


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

In 1991, Troy Davis was convicted of the murder of Savannah police office Mark MacPhail and sentenced to death. The state of Georgia executed Davis in 2011 amid public debate over his guilt or innocence.

 

A new radio drama based on a 2016 play explores the meaning of "reasonable doubt" in the Davis case. We spoke with Lee Nowell, the playwright of "Beyond Reasonable Doubt: The Troy Davis Project," about the play's origins and its new life as a podcast on GPB.

 


Donald Trump’s political rallies have been anything but dull over the past few months. Supporters and protestors have attended the gatherings in large numbers and their interactions have often turned ugly. Violence at Trump-sponsored events has been frequent, including several instances of protestors being assaulted by Trump supporters. Because these events are considered private events that are hosted by Trump’s campaign, the rules inside his rallies are much stricter than many people realize.