Transgender rights

Robin Rayne / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, a battle brews in Pickens County after the school superintendent issues a rule allowing transgender students to use the bathroom of their choice, leaving some parents up in arms. Our panel weighs in on the controversy in north Georgia.

“Attitudes are changing, they are in flux," The Atlanta Journal-Constitution's Jim Galloway said. "And this is something that the wall may hold for a number of years, but eventually I think there’s going to be a breach.” 


Provided by author, Samantha Allen

Author and journalist Samantha Allen wanted to go beyond the headlines in her new book, "Real Queer America: LGBT Stories from Red States."

"Often the stories we hear are just, 'Oh, this anti-LGBT law got passed' or 'This anti-LGBT law got stopped,' and we're not really seeing what's happening on the ground," said Allen.

From Provo, Utah, to Atlanta, Georgia, Allen's book explores the reasons why LGBT people stay and work for change in their communities, even when said communities might not openly accept or welcome them. Allen joined "On Second Thought" to discuss what her road trip taught her about the meaning of family and home.


GPB: Taylor Gantt

A new report by the FBI shows that violence against the LGBT community is on the rise.

The agency found that one out of every six hate crimes last year was based on sexual orientation.

And for transgender people living in the South, the statistics are even more grim.

According to the Human Right’s Campaign, 60 percent of violent incidents against transgender people happen in the South.

That includes four deaths this year in Georgia.

Atlanta is among many American cities making an aggressive bid for Amazon’s second headquarters. The Georgia city of Stonecrest even offered to de-annex some land and name it Amazon. The company’s first HQ is in Seattle, Washington. And Seattle has some wisdom to share with other cities who might want to attract the retail giant. A new podcast is called “Prime(d): What Happens When Amazon Comes to Your Town?” It’s produced by KUOW, Puget Sound Public Radio. Reporter Joshua McNichols joins us.