tornado

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Atlanta Red Cross

The threat of severe weather is over, but Georgia residents, especially those in Haralson and south Fulton counties, are waking up to serious damage.

Officials with the National Weather Service will investigate today whether the damage was caused by a tornado or tornadoes.

Grant Blankenship

The contents of a child’s room–baby dolls, blankets, toys–line the ditch in front of Cary Westbrook’s house in Radium Springs not far outside Albany. She hasn’t lived there since January. The windows are nailed dark with nine month old plywood and the roof is gone.

 

“It’s not habitable at all. At all,” Westbrook said.

 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

There is a mountain of shredded trees next to a church on Gillionville Road in Albany.

On a recent morning with the morning fog yet to lift, Brian Jefferson hauled in the day’s first load. About 20 cubic yards of limbs and tree trunks dumped at the bottom of a pile 30 feet tall and with a footprint of a ball field. Jefferson has made a lot of these trips since storms and tornados hit an eight county swath of South Georgia on January 2.

“I was working 11 hours, seven days a week. It’s just long,” he said.

A single tornado can cause a lot of damage. But even worse are tornado outbreaks. Just this week, a cluster of at least 18 tornadoes struck the Southeast over two days.

Scientists are seeing bigger clusters in recent years, and they're struggling to figure out what's happening.

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