Thanksgiving

Jade Abdul-Malik / GPB News

In Georgia, there’s a lot to be thankful for. From natural wonders like Stone Mountain to the culture and hospitality of the South, people from all over the state say their thanks in the spirit of Thanksgiving.

BILL BOLLING / ATLANTA COMMUNITY FOOD BANK

Bill Bolling knew from his first experience at the community kitchen at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Atlanta that he was destined for a life of service.

"I thought wow, this is it. After three college degrees and being a veteran — I even called my mother up and said, 'Mom! This is what God wants me to do,'" Bolling said. "Make soup!"

We spoke with Bill Bolling about founding the Atlanta Community Food Bank in 1979. The food bank has served over 750,000 people each year in Georgia. Bolling retired in 2015, but still actively works with food organizations like the Foodwell Alliance. He is also involved in collaborative efforts to combat poverty and housing inequality in the state.

 

Richard Drew / AP Photo

Fire safety experts are warning Georgians to be careful as they cook their Thanksgiving dinner.

 


Today we filled up on music and stories of community before Thanksgiving. We spoke with Sharon Collins, whose documentary named "The Macon Sound" premieres Nov. 20 on GPB. The documentary explores musicians like Otis Redding and Little Richard who helped make the town a destination for artists all over the country.

We also figured out how to navigate tense family holiday situations with some wisdom from author Anita Sanchez, plus heard some Thanksgiving stories from Kay Powell and Dame Wilburn.


Anita Sanchez

Thanksgiving is the time when people come together to celebrate with family and friends; however, the recent election and politics in general might make it harder to focus on love, blessings and gratitude.

Author Anita Sanchez shared her ideas for finding unity and connection in a season of so much conflict. She's the author of "The Four Sacred Gifts: Indigenous Wisdom for Modern Times."


Dianne Rosete / Flickr

A decade ago, StoryCorps launched the "National Day of Listening." The day after Thanksgiving, it's a time to share stories — to ask your grandma about meeting your grandpa or find the story behind a nickname or whatever makes you curious. 

 

We asked two storytellers, Dame Wilburn and Kay Powell, to share their Thanksgiving memories with us. Wilburn, from Macon, is an author, spoken word performer and Moth mainstage host. Powell, from Valdosta, is a writer and obituarist who has written legacies for moonshiners, the planet Pluto and Flannery O'Connor's peacock. 


Cost Of Thanksgiving Dinner Lowest Since 2010

Nov 20, 2018
Thanksgiving turkey
National Turkey Federation

Americans will be spending less on their Thanksgiving meal this year. The cost is down for the third year in a row.


Bill Bolling / Atlanta Community Food Bank

Bill Bolling knew from his first experience at the community kitchen at St. Luke's Episcopal Church in Atlanta that he was destined for a life of service.

"I thought wow, this is it. After three college degrees and being a veteran — I even called my mother up and said, 'Mom! This is what God wants me to do,'" Bolling said. "Make soup!"

We spoke with Bill Bolling about founding the Atlanta Community Food Bank in 1979. The food bank has served over 750,000 people each year in Georgia. Bolling retired in 2015, but still actively works with food organizations like the Foodwell Alliance. He is also involved in collaborative efforts to combat poverty and housing inequality in the state.


Yes, this White House tradition happened again. The president pardoned a pair of turkeys Tuesday.

They have punny names again — "Wishbone" and "Drumstick."

"Drumstick, you are hearby pardoned," Trump said of the bird that was chosen to be at the ceremony.

Trump then applauded and Drumstick gobbled.

Shutterstock.com

Behind many great recipes, you’ll find stories of immigration. That’s certainly the case in the kitchen of Pati Jinich. Her grandparents immigrated from Poland to Mexico. Now, Pati is a chef and cookbook author, renowned for her Jewish-Mexican fare. GPB’s Emily Cureton caught up with her last week while she was cooking at the General Muir restaurant in Atlanta.

CAROLINE HAYE / PHASE:3

It's time for our annual “Two Way Street” Thanksgiving cooking show. We’ll hear from four of Georgia’s most accomplished chefs, with their favorite Thanksgiving recipes and best holiday memories.

On today’s "Two Way Street" we present songs and stories about Thanksgiving and the upcoming holidays. Think of it as a playlist for the Thanksgiving weekend. Here are the songs we play on the show:

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Emily Jones / GPB News

Thanksgiving is always a busy time for charities that feed the hungry. And Hurricane Matthew has forced many of those groups in Savannah to work overtime since early October. The storm created more need - but it’s also inspired people to give back.

More than a month after Hurricane Matthew, many in Savannah are still recovering from the losses the storm brought. Food, lost during the power outage. Wages, lost during the evacuation. Homes, lost to flooding and fallen trees.

The sweet potato has a secret identity.

It's not just the food upon which marshmallows are heaped and maple syrup is poured to celebrate the holiday of Thanksgiving.

It is also a staple of the African diet. And Africans who eat it feel passionately about it. For some, it kindles warm memories. For some, it's a neglected food that deserves a higher profile because of its nutritional value.

And some people can't stand it!

It's Thanksgiving, which means you'll be seeing Aunt Martha's sweet potato casserole encased in a marshmallow cloud that has drifted too close to the sun. Cousin Joe, who's just here for the game, will bring his famous can-shaped cranberry sauce that looks like it's been attacked by a Slinky. Then your sister will arrive with her sad concoction of green beans drowning in cream-of-mushroom soup, flecked with floating onion strings that have been flung like debris from the Titanic.

You know the drill: Trace your hand, then add the details. Two feet, a beak, a single eyeball. Color it in, and voila! Hand becomes turkey.

You know the rest too: The Pilgrims fled England and landed on Plymouth Rock. The native people there, the Wampanoag, taught them to farm the land. In 1621, they sat down together for a thanksgiving feast, and we've been celebrating it ever since.

It's a lesson many remember from childhood, but the story has some problems.

Astronauts at the International Space Station are planning to spend Thanksgiving in quite a traditional fashion: There will be a turkey dinner with all the trimmings, good company, and football.

In a video taped in orbit, Space Station Commander Shane Kimbrough explains how the crewmates will celebrate the holiday.

What comes to mind when you think of food native to the U.S.? For many people it’s soda, hamburgers and hot dogs.

But think back further to a time when Native Americans were the country’s sole inhabitants, and there was no European influence on food.

Every holiday season, things get a "bit tricky," says Risa Greene, 53, from New York City. "You have one child who is a human garbage disposal and will eat anything you put in front of him, and you have another child who is more restricted than [the] TSA."

Greene's son is an omnivore — he eats everything. Her daughter, Jessica, is a vegan. She stopped eating meat when she was in high school years ago, then dropped dairy products and eggs in college and eventually gave up gluten, too.

Caroline Haye / Phase:3

On this edition of “Two Way Street,” we present our annual Thanksgiving cooking show. Every year we gather some of the finest chefs in the South in our studios to talk about their own Thanksgiving holiday memories, and to share with us recipes and tips for creating an outstanding holiday dinner. This year we have an exceptional group of chefs.

Friendsgiving: Taking Holidays Back From The Holidays

Nov 23, 2015
Sam Whitehead / GPB

Most holidays have some kind of baggage. Christmas has commercialism. Thanksgiving has travel headaches.

But one holiday celebrated this time of year seems, so far, to remain free of any such entanglements.