sustainability

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For more than a century, Georgia cotton farmers helped grow the American economy and the garment industry. The clothing industry has evolved many times over since then — now, it’s easy to pop into a store and walk out with a $5 t-shirt, most likely synthetic and made outside of Georgia and even the United States.

But after decades of increasingly cheap, “fast” fashion, there are signs of change. Sustainable fashion was featured on some catwalks for Spring 2020 collections, and fast fashion giant Forever 21 filed for bankruptcy earlier this week. A growing consumer movement is re-evaluating the social and environmental impacts of the global clothing trade.


A stretch of I-85 in southwest Georgia is a proving ground for technologies that could make such roadways ecologically sustainable.  Allie Kelly, executive director of The Ray, visits On Second Thought to talk about the road renovations.

The lack of affordable housing is a hot topic in Georgia cities.  The median home price in Georgia is on track to nearly double from 2012 in the coming years.  GPB’s Ross Terrell asked Housing and Urban Development Secretary Ben Carson about gentrification and regulation and how it affects many facets of Georgians including veterans and minorities.


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Transportation — trucks, trains, planes and automobiles — is a major source of greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S. Electric vehicles offer a less polluting alternative. That, and reduced fuel costs are strong selling points. Limited battery range is not.

But shorter distances, and those savings, work for many local governments. Last month, Savannah added two new electric cars to its city fleet. Nick Deffley is the director of Savannah's Office of Sustainability. He joined On Second Thought from GPB's studio in Savannah to talk about how the city began its transition to electric vehicles.


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Eighteen miles of I-85 could be an on-ramp to the future.

The Ray C. Anderson Memorial Highway, or The Ray, stretches from West Point to LaGrange. Named for a carpet manufacturer once called the "greenest CEO," The Ray is now a proving ground for technologies that could make infrastructure safer and more ecologically sustainable.

So, how would it work? We asked Allie Kelly, executive director of The Ray.