Steve Luxenberg

On Second Thought For Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2019

Aug 28, 2019

It’s back-to-school time, which looks a lot different for women now than in decades past.  For female students, getting an education used to mean attending finishing school courses on being a “proper” wife and hostess.  The Lucy Cobb Institute helped change that. 

University of Georgia Professor Fran Teague and WUGA student Kristen Gragg visit On Second Thought to explore how this Georgia facility expanded what women could learn and do.

photo credit, Josh Luxenberg/Twitter

If asked about the "Plessy v. Ferguson" case, many Americans might connect the case to racial segregation. Far fewer would know the name Homer Plessy or what happened after he was arrested for refusing to leave a whites-only railway car in New Orleans the summer of 1892. 

Author and "Washington Post" editor Steve Luxenberg discovered the act of protest was decades in the making. Luxenberg joined "On Second Thought" and explained how Plessy, a fair-skinned man of African descent, was the perfect plant to challenge the constitutionality of separate rail cars in a case that made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1896.