Stephen Fowler

This week held playoffs for both the Braves and Atlanta United, but for the fans it is not only about wins and losses. On Second Thought delves into the psychology of Atlanta fandom with psychiatrist and researcher, Dr. Seth Norrholm.


Judge Amy Totenberg has ruled Georgia will use its outdated voting machines for one more election. Then, it’s time for change. Delve into the 153-page ruling with GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler.  

 

A metro Atlanta police department is trying out a pilot program to help opioid users go to treatment facilities instead of jail. Travel there for the story with GPB’s Ellen Eldridge.

 

 


Consuming political news is like drinking from a firehose. Each day presents a new tweet, a new storyline and a new debate to process. It can be exhausting, and often national conversations obscure important topics like Americans’ fundamental right to vote. 

On Second Thought wants to shift the paradigm, so GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler is presenting listeners with a segment called “Slow Democracy.” Like the slow food movement, it looks at the sources, alterations and underpinnings of participatory democracy.


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The busy season for Georgia state lawmakers is now over.  Yes, the legislative session wrapped up April 2, but Sunday marked the final close to the 2019 lawmaking season.  Gov. Brian Kemp had 40 days after Sine Die to publicly sign or veto bills.  Now, everything that hasn’t seen his pen automatically becomes law.


It’s been another busy week in Georgia politics.  Gov. Brian Kemp has just announced his intention to seek a Medicaid waiver from the federal government.  Meanwhile, legislators are a quarter of the way through the session.  They’re tackling issues ranging from the $27.5 billion budget to offshore drilling and its effect on the coast.

GPB Politics Reporter Stephen Fowler offered his weekly recap to “On Second Thought” listeners.

Connor Carey / Wikimedia Commons

The third week of Georgia’s legislative session is now over. Lawmakers in the House and Senate have burned through seven out of 40 scheduled days.

It’s budget time at the capitol. State legislators have been hearing from state agencies that are pressing their needs for next year’s fiscal plan. GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler has kept a close watch on the action under the Gold Dome.  He stopped by “On Second Thought” for an update.

 


Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp gives a thumbs-up to supporters, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, in Athens, Ga.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

Monday is a pivotal day in Georgia politics. Brian Kemp is being sworn in as the state’s 83rd governor while Geoff Duncan becomes lieutenant governor and Brad Raffensperger takes on the role of secretary of state.  It’s also the first day of the legislative session. The Georgia General Assembly now has 40 days to pass new legislation and shape the future of the state.

GPB Politics Reporter Stephen Fowler and “Political Rewind” host Bill Nigut stopped by “On Second Thought” to explore both of these topics.


John Bazemore / The Associated Press

Security questions continue to swirl around Georgia’s electoral process. Lawmakers largely agree the state’s current touch-screen voting machines have to go. They don’t leave a paper trail, and some analysts worry they could be hacked. The question isn’t whether the machines need to be replaced – but how.

BET

Since hip-hop first got its start in 1973, two cities were the main players in driving its style and sound.

On the East Coast there was New York, and on the West Coast there was L.A.

Atlanta is now home to many of hip-hop’s current and former stars, making it the “third coast” in A3C’s “All Three Coasts” moniker.

As the East Coast-West Coast rivalry came to a head in 1995, a duo from Atlanta named OutKast managed to win Best New Rap Group at the Source Awards.

While the New York-heavy crowd booed, Andre 3000 grabbed the award and took the audience to task. 

thecamkirk.tumblr.com

Atlanta’s presence in the hip-hop scene has been well established for many years with the likes of OutKast, Ludacris and Soulja Boy making the city’s artists into household names.

Even if you know hip-hop, you might not know this name: Cam Kirk.

I went to downtown Atlanta to learn more about Kirk and how hip-hop looks from behind the lens.