STEM

Lisa Yaszek, professor of science fiction studies, in front of a bookshelf seated at a table.
Rob Felt / Georgia Tech

Women have historically been erased from science fiction storytelling, but Lisa Yaszek is working to change that. Her new anthology “The Future Is Female! 25 Classic Science Fiction Stories by Women, from Pulp Pioneers to Ursula K. Le Guin” showcases female pioneers in the genre since the 1920s.

We spoke with Yaszek, who is a professor of science fiction studies at Georgia Tech, about how women have shaped our understanding of technology and identity.

A group of middle school students from Dacula, Georgia, is preparing for a world championship. This weekend the “Robo Sapiens” will head to Louisville, Kentucky for the 2018 VEX Robotics World Championship, where they will present the findings of their latest research on racist robots and bias in artificial intelligence. GPB's Leah Fleming spoke with three students on the team and their coach about their discoveries and their passion for the science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) fields. 

Courtesy of the Robo Sapiens

A group of middle school students from Dacula, Georgia, is preparing for a world championship. This weekend the “Robo Sapiens” will head to Louisville, Kentucky for the 2018 VEX Robotics World Championship, where they will present the findings of their latest research on racist robots and bias in artificial intelligence.

Maura Currie / GPB

Throughout March, the Atlanta Science Festival is putting on events to celebrate science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). 

This year, it tried something new: The festival has partnered with the Center for Puppetry Arts to show kids how science and the arts come together. 

On Second Thought producer Maura Currie went to a workshop and brought back an audio postcard.

Photo courtesy of Peach State LSAMP

According to a National Science Foundation report from 2014, Hispanic college students received only 12 percent of science and engineering bachelor’s degrees and African-American students less than 9 percent.

The Peach State Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation (LSAMP) funds and encourages students of color to get involved in more STEM majors. LSAMP provides stipends and career development opportunities  at six different colleges in Georgia. 

Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary

Students across the Southeast took part in an underwater robotics competition last weekend. Gray's Reef National Marine Sanctuary hosted the event and created a variety of challenges for the robots to complete. Each team had to build and program a remotely operated vehicle. GPB Savannah’s Gabrielle Ware was at the competition and brings us this audio postcard.

 

Dan Carsen / WBHM

Given thousands of related job openings but only hundreds of computer science college graduates, Alabama is trying to ramp up its computer science education. That includes a new policy allowing those classes to count toward core math graduation requirements. WBHM’s Dan Carsen concludes the Southern Education Desk series “Priming the Pipeline for STEM in the South” with a visit to a Birmingham-area class that’s leading the way.

Hoover High School junior Griffin Davis is all about his computer science class.

Lynn Hatter / WFSU

Florida students don’t have to take a foreign language to graduate from a public high school, but the state’s public university system does require at least two years of study in another language. Computer Coders have found a champion in Florida Senator Jeremy Ring. Ring, a former Yahoo! executive, believes coding and technology is an art, rather than a science. The Margate Democrat says why not broaden the language offerings? Instead of the usual suspects, like French or Spanish, and for those who are true romantics—Latin… why not something like Python? Or C++?

Grant Blankenship / GPB

First-graders at The Lovett School in Atlanta are learning geometry a bit differently than usual. They’re building three-dimensional cubes, using any materials they choose.

This approach follows a method The Lovett School calls “exploration based” learning. That is exactly the kind of method that State Superintendent Richard Woods looks for in educational programs.