Stacey Abrams

On this edition of Political Rewind, the race for 2020 is well underway and Georgia is already a player.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Former Democratic nominee for governor Stacey Abrams is launching a statewide "Thank You" tour for her supporters. 

According to a press release, Abrams and her team will "take the time to thank volunteers and supporters who invested their time in her historic 2018 campaign."

Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photos/John Amis, File)

Kevin Liles, a photographer in Atlanta, is suing Brian Kemp’s campaign and the Georgia Republican Party for their use of images Liles took of Stacey Abrams. 

The suit, filed in the United States District Court in Atlanta on Jan. 8, claims that a photo of Kemp’s Democratic opponent, which was published in the New York Times and is posted on his personal website, was used in an advertisement without his permission.

Stacey Abrams on the campaign trail during the 2018 Midterm Election.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Former Democratic Candidate for Governor Stacey Abrams is using her fundraising abilities to aid Democrats in the state and to ensure that she remains at the forefront of the state’s Democratic party

President Donald Trump salutes as he steps off Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Sunday, Jan. 6, 2019, in Washington. Trump is returning from a trip to Camp David.
Alex Brandon / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, leaders at the state capitol are beginning to write the budget for the coming fiscal year. But how could signs of a possible economic downturn affect their spending plans? Our panel looks at the challenge.


Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger during an election commisison meeting in Macon. On Wednesday, Raffensperger annonuced Georgia will hold its presidential primary on March 24, 2020.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp declares it’s time to set aside politics and govern for the good of all Georgians. Are Democrats ready to bury the hatchet after a brutal campaign?


WhenisCalendars.com/Google Images

On this edition of Political Rewind, a lawsuit filed in federal court calls for changes to Georgia laws that supporters of Stacey Abrams say suppressed the vote in the midterm election. 


Political Rewind: Kemp Lays Out His Agenda

Nov 20, 2018
In a file photo, now Governor-elect Brian Kemp gives a thumbs-up to supporters, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, in Athens, Ga.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor-elect Brian Kemp lays out the basics of his policy agenda.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Georgia’s gubernatorial race, overshadowed by accusations of unfairness from both sides, is over.  On Nov. 17, officials certified the results and declared Republican Brian Kemp governor-elect. 

Democrat Stacey Abrams is not challenging that outcome, but, in a fiery speech, she slammed the electoral process that produced it.  “Political Rewind” host Bill Nigut stops by “On Second Thought” to offer analysis.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

As governor-elect Brian Kemp was announcing a team that will lead his transition into the governor’s mansion, his opponent Democrat Stacey Abrams was in the middle of her own transition of sorts. 

During an impassioned speech Friday evening, titled “I Will Not Concede,” Abrams acknowledged Kemp would become governor-elect of Georgia but refused to offer concession in a bitter, tight race that saw an increase in turnout and an increase in problems reported at the polls.  

 

 

Georgia Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp gives a thumbs-up to supporters, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, in Athens, Ga.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, after nearly two weeks of uncertainty, Georgia has a new Governor. We'll discuss how both candidates will move forward to help the state heal from a fractious election.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Democrat Stacey Abrams has ended her campaign to be the governor of Georgia.

Flanked by supporters and staff at her campaign headquarters in Atlanta, Abrams said there was “no further viable remedy” to continue the fight for a runoff with Republican Brian Kemp.

A glimpse at the teleprompter on the floor showed her speech was called “I Will Not Concede,” and Abrams, who would have been the country's first black female governor, said this was not meant to be a speech of concession.

Sen. Nikema Williams (D-Atlanta) is arrested by capitol police during a protest over election ballot counts in the rotunda of the state capitol building Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018, in Atlanta.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, it’s been another tumultuous week in Georgia politics.


People hold signs as they protest the election in the rotunda of the state capitol building Tuesday, Nov. 13, 2018, in Atlanta.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, more court cases and the counting goes on as Georgian's wait for a clear winner in the governor's race.

Harry S. Truman Library & Museum

More than a week after Election Day, the drama over Georgia's gubernatorial race is mounting. Police arrested demonstrators Tuesday at the state Capitol, insisting that every vote be counted before election certification. A federal judge has delayed the deadline for certifying results until Friday.

Notably, news organizations have not yet called the race, though at last count Kemp maintained a comfortable lead. Abrams would need about 17,000 votes to force a runoff. Some wins that were projected by the Associated Press on election night, such as the Florida governor's race, are now in the middle of a recount. 

That made us wonder: With such high stakes and razor-thin margins, why do networks and news organizations declare results before all votes are counted? 

David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, a federal judge delays the certification of ballots until the end of the week. Our panel takes a look at what factors led to this decision and the impact if could have of the race for governor and tight congressional contests.


Sean Powers / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the election certification deadline looms both campaigns continue feuding six days after the polls closed. Democrats say they still have a shot at winning the governor’s mansion and the 7th District Congressional seat.


Left Stacey Abrams addresses supporters during an election night watch party. Right, Brian Kemp speaks to supporters Wednesday.
John Amis/John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp proclaims victory in the governor’s race, but Stacey Abrams is insisting missing ballots make his claim premature. Our panel weighs in on what to make of the dueling scenarios.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

Volunteers for Democratic candidate for governor Stacey Abrams raced to make an important Friday deadline to ensure all votes in the gubernatorial race were counted.

Volunteers at phone banks across Georgia called the 21,000 voters who cast a provisional ballot to tell them they had until 5 p.m. to get to their local election board and clear up things like voter ID issues and get their vote counted.

Ross Terrell / GPB News

Republican Brian Kemp resigned as Georgia’s secretary of state Thursday.

Gov. Nathan Deal said he has accepted the resignation and will name Robyn Crittenden, commissioner of the Department of Human Services, as the interim secretary.

John Amis / AP Photo

Republican candidate for governor Brian Kemp’s team declared victory in the tight race for governor during a conference call this afternoon. 

Austin Chambers is a strategist with the campaign. He says there aren’t enough remaining ballots to force a runoff.

“The takeaway is clear, this election is over, the votes have been counted and there’s a clear winner. Brian Kemp is the governor-elect in Georgia.”

John Amis / AP Photo

It’s been a long, hard-fought race for Georgia governor, and it’s not over yet.  Republican Brian Kemp has not declared victory, and Democrat Stacey Abrams has not yet conceded.

GPB’s Ross Terrell and Stephen Fowler stopped by “On Second Thought” to explain what’s next for this election. On Election Night, Ross was at Kemp’s watch party, and Stephen was with Abrams. 

On this edition of Political Rewind, our panel breaks down the available numbers from the latest election results.


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

Democratic Candidate for Governor Stacey Abrams refuses to concede when she addressed crowds of supporters in Atlanta, GA. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Republican Brian Kemp was reluctant to declare victory after Democrat Stacey Abrams refused to concede.


Joel McLendon / flickr

Today on Political Rewind, Election Day is here. Join us for the latest updates from polling places across the state.


Left, Former President Barack Obama campaigns for Stacey Abrams in Atlanta. Right, President Donald Trump campaigns for Brian Kemp in Macon.
Stephen Fowler/John Bazemore / GPB News/AP Images

On this edition of Political Rewind, a contentious battle for governor is ending with the most bitter recriminations yet. 


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

The last days of the governor’s race between Democrat Stacey Abrams and Republican Brian Kemp have been rocked by allegations made by the secretary of state’s office that the state Democratic Party attempted to break into Georgia voter rolls. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

President Donald Trump traveled to Georgia two days before the deadlocked in the polls race between Republican Brian Kemp and Democrat Stacey Abrams to be the state's next governor. 

The president chose an airport hangar in Macon left empty when Canadian company Bombardier closed up shop as the place to stump for Kemp. 

Thousands of people attended the rally. A far smaller number of them actually slept out by the hangar overnight to get a good seat. Among them was Lynn White. Like most at the rally, she said the event would have no bearing on how she was going to vote. 

Stephen Fowler / GPB News

“The consequences of any of us staying home really are profound, because America is at a crossroads."

That was the message from former President Barack Obama, who campaigned at a historically black college for Democrat Stacey Abrams, who could become the country’s first black female governor.

Pages