Southern literature

Dyana Bagby / Charis Books

E.R. Anderson is the executive director of Charis Circle, the nonprofit programming arm of feminist bookstore Charis Books and More in Atlanta. Anderson stopped by "On Second Thought" to share more choices for our "Southern Reading List" series in which authors and readers share books that define and reflect the South.

Anderson highlighted Kiese Laymon's "Heavy: An American Memoir," which describes Laymon's relationships with trauma, toxic masculinity and his own family.


Little Shop of Stories / Facebook

Justin Colussy-Estes is the store manager of Little Shop of Stories, a bookstore in Decatur focusing on literature for children and adults. He stopped by "On Second Thought" to share his choices for our "Southern Reading List." It's our series of authors and readers sharing books that define and reflect the South.

"The funny thing about Southern literature is that nowadays it's gotten so expansive," said Colussy-Estes. "It can mean so many different things that I think there's some really exciting things out there." He chose a range of books by Georgia authors, including picture books and memoirs.


Courtesy Jonathan Blanc

Whether celebrated joyfully or begrudgingly, Valentine's Day is the holiday when the varieties of love – or the absence of love – come sharply into focus.

"On Second Thought" marks the day with "An American Marriage" author and Atlanta native Tayari Jones. The story of an Atlanta couple bound together – and torn apart – by a skewed criminal justice system, "An American Marriage" reminds us that no love exists in a vacuum.


The novel "Southernmost" begins with a flood of biblical proportions. What emerges after is not a sliver of mountaintop, but a sodden, Southern Appalachian town where a fundamentalist preacher struggles mightily with his rigid beliefs. 


Goldie Taylor/Twitter

Political strategist and author Goldie Taylor knows Georgia politics. Her most recent novel, "Paper Gods," is a political thriller set in Atlanta's halls of power. Taylor stopped by "On Second Thought" with her picks for our "Southern Reading List" series, in which authors and readers share books that both define and reflect the South.


Ted Anthony / Associated Press

Frank Reiss and Emmy Carmichael from A Cappella Books in Atlanta stopped by "On Second Thought" to share their recommendations for our "Southern Reading List." It's our series of authors and readers sharing books that define and reflect the South.

 

Carmichael recommends Caleb Johnson's "Treeborne" and Hannah Pittard's "Visible Empire." Reiss recommends Anne Gisleson's "The Futilitarians: Our Year of Thinking, Drinking, Grieving, and Reading" and Michael Farris Smith's "The Fighter."

 


Joshilyn Jackson / http://joshilynjackson.com/

Atlanta-based author Joshilyn Jackson has written eight novels, including "The Opposite of Everyone" and "Almost Sisters." She stopped by "On Second Thought" to give her picks for our "Southern Reading List" series, in which authors and readers share books that both define and reflect the South.


The Bitter Southerner Summer Reading Roundup

May 22, 2018
Graphic by Bitter Southerner

If you are an avid reader, we have some suggestions for you.

The Bitter Southerner just released its 2018 "Summer Reading Roundup," a list of the year's best Southern books.

 


Spring has arrived in Georgia. Are you ready to relax outside with a good book? We asked Literary Atlanta podcast host Alison Law and Decatur-based author Nicki Salcedo to tell us about the best new books by Southern writers. We also talked with the Breakroom gang about the most discussed news items of the week.

4 New Southern Books You Need To Read

Apr 20, 2018

Literary Atlanta podcast host Alison Law and Decatur-based author Nicki Salcedo joined us in studio to share their picks of the best new books by Southern writers. 

Chapel Hill Public Library / Flickr

Between 1956 and 1961, "To Kill a Mockingbird" author Harper Lee wrote a series of personal letters, now available to the public at Emory University's Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives and Rare Book Library.

The letters, written during the same period as Lee wrote "Mockingbird" and "Go Set a Watchman," sheds light on the relationships of a renowned writer who was legendarily private. The correspondence also provides a new look into the civil rights movement-era South in which Lee wrote her novels. 

We talked with Emory University history professor Joe Crespino about these letters. His latest book, "Atticus Finch: The Biography," focuses on the influences that shaped Lee's writing.