Southern Cooking

Maupin photo by Christopher Turner

On this episode of Two Way Street, we hear from two Southern writers from the Decatur Book Festival.

In front of an audience at the festival, new host Virginia Prescott interviews authors Rick Bragg and Armistead Maupin on the way their Southern heritage shapes their writing.
 


Erika Beras for NPR

Culinary historian Michael Twitty traces his ancestry—both black and white—through food. In his memoir, "The Cooking Gene," he asks the question: "Who owns Southern food?" We talked with him ahead of his appearance on Thursday, Sept. 21 at 8 p.m.

A recent study done by the Department of Labor shows that employed Americans spend more time working than on any other activity during the hours they are awake.  Of them, many say they dislike where they work, but few really do love their jobs. The Atlanta Business Chronicle just released its annual list of the best places to work here in the city.  Joining us to talk about the keys to workplace happiness is Tom Conklin, Clinical Associate Professor of Managerial Sciences at Georgia State University.

Photo: Jason Thrasher

John T. Edge is the director of the Southern Foodways Alliance. Based out of the University of Mississippi, the SFA studies and documents Southern food cultures. A respected authority, Edge writes about Southern food and culture for publications such as Garden & Gun Magazine and The Oxford American.

Malingering / Flickr

A recent article from The New Yorker magazine called barbecue the most political food in America. The author argues barbecue has its roots in racism and discrimination. We discuss this history with Chuck Reece, editor of the Bitter Southerner. Also joining us are food writers Michael Twitty, and Kathleen Purvis of the Charlotte Observer.