South Georgia

Jeremy Jacobs, Curator Emeritus National Museum of Natural History

In 2008, G. Wayne Clough became the 12th secretary of the Smithsonian. The Douglas native and Georgia Tech president emeritus was the first Southerner to hold the position.

When Clough retired from his post, he decided to write about his birthplace of South Georgia. At the same time, he dove into the Smithsonian's vast collections, searching for artifacts from the region. He shares what he found in his memoir Things New and Strange: A Southerner's Journey through the Smithsonian Collections.


Mitch Bulger / Pine Knoll Pecan Plantation

Gov. Nathan Deal called a special legislative session starting Nov. 13 to discuss relief efforts for Hurricane Michael damage. Farmers in southwest Georgia were hit especially hard. Ricky Dollison, from Dollison Farms in Worth County, said he lost thirty pigs in one night and is still working to salvage swine.

He and farmer Casey Cox, from Longleaf Ridge in Mitchell County, joined "On Second Thought" to discuss their hopes for the special legislative session. They also shared how reconstruction efforts on their farms are going a month out from the hurricane.


Georgia Department of Agriculture

Hurricane Michael swept across south Georgia last week, devastating the state's pecan orchards, cotton plants, chicken coops and peanut crops. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) administrator Brock Long said Monday the true cost of the devastation won't be clear for some time. Irwin County pecan grower Randy Hudson and Berrien County cotton grower Mark Peele told "On Second Thought" they expect it could take generations for Georgia farmers to recoup their losses — if ever.

"You can't walk away, but then I'm sitting here with such a dead load," said Hudson, a fifth-generation pecan farmer. "How do I repay this now? How do I start over?"


Georgia Department of Agriculture

President Donald Trump was in Georgia Monday to survey the damage from Hurricane Michael. The storm killed at least 19 people. Michael also ravaged Georgia's agriculture industry, splitting decades — and even centuries — old pecan trees down the middle and stripping cotton plants across thousands of acres in South Georgia.

 

"We lead the nation in pecan production, peanut production, forest products production ... in cotton and vegetables, but, unfortunately, today, we lead in destruction," Georgia Agriculture Commissioner Gary Black told "On Second Thought."


WALB News 10

We spoke by phone to people from McRae, Plains and Valdosta about how Hurricanes may be the new normal for South Georgia. 


Brian Brown

As metro Atlanta grows, the population of rural Georgia shrinks. Photographer Brian Brown is documenting the architecture of the country before it disappears. He started where he grew up, and created the website “Vanishing South Georgia.” Now he has sites devoted to North and Coastal Georgia, too. We talk with Brown about what there is to learn from decaying houses and shuttered storefronts.

This summer, 27 so-called micronations gathered in Dunwoody, Georgia for MicroCon 2017. A micronation is defined as a small, self-proclaimed entity which claims to be an independent sovereign state, but is not acknowledged as such by any recognized sovereign state, or by any supranational organization. Vice News produced a documentary from the convention, which featured many micronations based within Georgia. We get the inside scoop from Vice Media Video Producer Oliver Noble.

Cleaning Up Georgia's Coal Ash Ponds

Nov 13, 2017
Flickr

Coal ash is a toxic substance. For years it was haphazardly dumped into rivers and ponds. Within the last 10 years or so, there has been a push to clean up the way coal ash is disposed. Georgia Power has vowed to close all its dump ponds. We talk with Chris Bowers, a senior attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center. We also hear from Jen Hilburn of Altamaha Riverkeeper.

For most of us, our idea of politics is influenced by what we see on TV. Millions of Americans regularly watch shows like “The West Wing,” “Veep,” and “House of Cards." Georgia native Jay Carson worked as supervising producer and political consultant for Netflix’s “House of Cards.” We talk with him about how to write engaging political drama in 2017, and how much the fictional White House resembles the real one.

Emily Cureton / GPB News

Hundreds of animals and their humans have evacuated to the Georgia National Fairgrounds and Agricultural Center in Perry, Georgia, ahead of Hurricane Irma.

Horses are welcomed with a free stall, three bags of shavings and access to the arenas. State veterinary regulations are suspended for animals coming from Florida and within the state of Georgia. As of Saturday morning, nearly 200 horses were on site, with at least as many humans tending to them. Barn managers say the facility can hold 350 horses in stalls, but no one will be turned away.

GPB News/Emily Cureton

In South Georgia’s Wiregrass Country, a plaque in the town of Quitman marks a hanging place. It’s where, in August of 1864, four men were executed for plotting a slave rebellion. Over the next century, mob violence against African-Americans often erupted in South Georgia.

This is where our Senior Editor Don Smith was born and raised. He moved away in 1958. Don recently went back to his hometown to mark the anniversary of the Civil War hanging, and talk with longtime residents about how they remember the county’s history of racial violence. GPB's Emily Cureton reports.