sonny perdue

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, in the wake of Johnny Isakson’s surprise decision to retire, two U.S. Senate seats are now on the ballot in Georgia in 2020. As Republicans and Democrats engage in complex maneuvering to benefit in the aftermath of Isakson’s announcement, we’ll take a behind the scenes look at the races for each seat.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, warning signs emerge that Gov. Brian Kemp’s plans for a partial expansion of Medicaid in Georgia may not win full support from the federal government and could cost far more than the state may be able to pay.

Texas GOP Rep. Chip Roy objected to speeding the measure through a nearly empty chamber and complained that it does not contain any of President Donald Trump's $4.5 billion request for border wall funding.
CSPAN

On this edition of Political Rewind, after months of delay, the U.S Senate approved a disaster relief package that would send relief money to Georgia and other states hit by natural disasters. However, in the House of Representatives, Texas Rep. Chip Roy blocked the measure.


Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue on Capitol Hill.
Susan Walsh / AP

Most politicians hope to avoid satirical publications and media attention that is meant to poke fun at them, but Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue has taken a different approach.

The Trump Cabinet Member was featured in an article from "The Onion" that mocks Perdue and the government shutdown.

Wikimedia Commons

Is Georgia turning blue? That question came up in 2014 when Jason Carter ran for governor, in 2016 when Hillary Clinton ran for president and in 2017 with Jon Ossoff’s campaign in the most expensive House race in history. Every time, however, Georgia remained a red state where Republicans won.


Public Domain

This week, the U.S. Department of Agriculture launched a new program to help farmers in the wake of a potential trade war with China.


Georgia Supreme Court

Georgia's new supreme court chief justice was sworn in Tuesday at the state capitol.


Brian Kemp speaks during a campaign event outlining policy intiatives for veterans in Georgia.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, with just over two months until voters decide this year’s election campaigns on both sides of the aisle are busy.


U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga.
Alex Brandon / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, in a powerful rebuke on the Senate floor, Georgia’s Johnny Isakson takes aim at anyone who might treat the memory of John McCain with disrespect. Although President Donald Trump was not mentioned by name, the intention seemed clear.


(AP Photo/Mark Wallheiser, File)

From GPB News, this is Political Rewind.  Today, a long-awaited decision from the United States Supreme Court in Florida’s fight with Georgia over water rights from the Chattahoochee and Flint Rivers.  We’ll discuss what happens next in the fight. 


U.S. Department of Agriculture

U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue talked trade in Canada Friday. The former Georgia governor met with his Candian counterpart, Lawrence MacAulay, on Prince Edward Island. Perdue’s trip comes after President Trump imposed tariffs on Canadian steel and aluminum.

(AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli, file)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp doubles down on his muscular advocacy for gun rights and it just may be propelling him forward in the GOP governor’s race.  The AJC’s Jim Galloway tells us why he thinks the Parkland massacre has not deterred, but empowered gun supporters.  We’ll also discuss the risky path Democrat Stacey Abrams charts as she works to win her party’s nomination.  Plus, Sonny Perdue’s biggest battle yet as Agriculture Secretary and why Atlanta could soon be on the national political stage once again. 

Panelists:

Today on "Political Rewind," we discuss Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue's promise to farmers that they won't bare the brunt of a potential trade war with China. This, even as the President bares down on his threat to expand tariffs on Chinese goods. 

Charlie Neibergall/AP

New organic meat regulations are coming in May. The USDA will be less strict on how animals are raised, fed and transported. We looked at what this means for Georgia’s massive poultry industry.

(AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

On this edition of Political Rewind, three Georgians take center stage in controversies now swirling on Capitol Hill.  FBI Director Chris Wray contradicts the White House story on when administration officials learned that Rob Porter was suspected of abusing his two former wives.  Will Chief of State John Kelly get the boot over concerns about what he knew and when?  Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue faces fire for a proposal to substitute food stamps for government-selected food boxes, but what's really behind the idea?  Also, David Perdue is in the spotlight as he pushes his plan to curt

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

Dependable sources of labor and a fresh look at international trade topped the wish list of farmers and other stakeholders when they met with U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Sonny Perdue Friday.

Perdue held a roundtable discussion in Tifton in his role as the head of President Trump’s Task Force on Rural Prosperity. It was the first such roundtable in the South.

“We’re here from the federal government and we’re here not to hurt you,” Perdue joked.

When it comes to feeding kids a healthy diet, "it's not politics, it's parenting," Michelle Obama said Friday.

And then she got a little fired up.

Without ever naming President Trump, the former first lady took aim at changes the administration announced last week that weaken some of the school nutrition standards she championed.

The Trump administration has said it wants to remove burdensome regulation, and on Monday it served up a taste of what that looks like when it comes to two aspects of food policy: school lunch and calorie labels on menus.

Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue announced a plan to delay a mandate that would require schools to further reduce sodium levels in the meals they serve. In addition, Perdue wants to give the green light to schools that want to serve some grains that aren't whole-grain rich.

Dozens of Democrats joined Republicans in the Senate to confirm former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue as the next secretary of agriculture.

The vote was 87-11. Perdue's cousin, Sen. David Perdue, R-Ga., voted "present" and presided over the vote.

Sonny Perdue grew up on a farm in central Georgia and has owned several agriculture companies. He is not associated with the food company Perdue or the poultry producer Perdue Farms.

NPR's Geoff Bennett reports for our Newscast unit:

If confirmed Monday agriculture secretary nominee Sonny Perdue confronts an industry in search of stability.

The farm economy is declining, trade with vital global markets is in disarray and immigration policy is in flux. In his initial budget, Trump suggested a 21 percent cut to USDA's discretionary spending, so Perdue would want to jump into Washington policy discussions quickly.

Perdue would find a desk at USDA piled high with priorities and will be one of the last members of President Donald Trump's cabinet to be seated.

Evan Vucci / The Associated Press

A high priority for President Donald Trump is getting his cabinet nominees approved by the U.S. Senate. Late last week, he named his one remaining choice: former Georgia governor Sonny Perdue as secretary of agriculture.

President-elect Donald Trump is expected to name former Georgia Gov. Sonny Perdue as his nominee for agriculture secretary, according to a transition official and a source close to the process.

This is the last open Cabinet position, although Trump has yet to name a Council of Economic Advisors chair, which is a Cabinet-level position.

The process of selecting an agriculture secretary turned into a marathon, as Trump interviewed many candidates.

Perdue was a favorite among major farmers' groups and leaders in the Republican establishment.