Slavery

UGA COLLEGE OF AG & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES - OCCS

The University of Georgia has been seeking research proposals about the school's history regarding slavery.

University administrators say they're committing $100,000 for the effort.

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This year marks 400 years since the transatlantic slave trade began. On Aug. 20, 1619, a ship carrying the first enslaved Africans to what became the United Stated arrived in Virginia, changing the course of American history.

Studies show farmers and agricultural workers are at elevated risk of suicide, and Georgia farmers have been especially hard hit by natural disasters and tariffs. 

Anna Scheyett, the dean of UGA’s School of Social Work, has been researching the problem. She visited On Second Thought to share her ideas to help.


Summer Evans

It's Juneteenth, also known as "Freedom Day"  — commemorating the ending of slavery in the United States. It was on June 19, 1865, when union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, to announce slavery had been abolished. That was two years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation of Proclamation.

On Second Thought looked at Juneteenth traditions and history with Daina Ramey Berry. Berry is professor of history and African and African diaspora studies at the University of Texas at Austin. She's also author of four books that detail the history of slavery, including "The Price for Their Pound of Flesh."


Credit: George Fadil Muhammad

Juneteenth, also known as Freedom Day, commemorates the official end of slavery in the U.S. in 1865, more than two years after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation. Union soldiers arrived in Galveston, Texas, and announced the end of the American Civil War to the last group of enslaved people in the country.

The day itself is June 19, but celebrations kick off across Georgia this weekend, from big festivals to more intimate evening conversations.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The University of Georgia continues to grapple with a difficult chapter of its history. It’s been under fire for how it handled the discovery of human remains under a school building during renovations. They appear to belong to people who were enslaved.

The growing tension recently erupted in protests. Demonstrators want reparations for descendants of slaves who built the university, including financial support for university staff and students as well as acknowledgment of the school’s history publicly and within the classroom.

GPB reporter Grant Blankenship went to Athens to witness the protests, and he talks with On Second Thought about what he found.


There's a building on the campus of the University of Georgia where the foundation rests on the bodies of enslaved people.

That's Baldwin Hall on UGA's picturesque North Campus. It's been years since more than 100 burials of enslaved people were discovered during an expansion of the building that houses the Anthropology Department. Since then, many on campus at UGA and in the larger Athens community have not been happy with the way UGA handled those remains.


Arcade Publishing

Members of Congress are working to revive an Obama-era effort to make Harriet Tubman the new face of the $20 bill. A new historical novel about Tubman gives reader a whole new face and consideration of the woman known as the "Moses of her people." 


Wikimedia Commons

The Peabody Awards announced winners in radio and podcasting this week, among them Type Investigations and Reveal for their "Monumental Lies" episode. After filing 175 open records requests to track public spending on Confederate memorials and organizations, reporters Brian Palmer and Seth Freed Wessler found that more than $40 million in state and federal funds have been spent on the maintenance and expansion of such monuments and sites over the past decade.

Leighton Rowell / GPB

Town and gown tensions are high at the University of Georgia as the end of the school year nears. Amid national conversations about the historical role of U.S. colleges and universities in slavery, community leaders and a group of faculty are calling on UGA to do more to address its own slave past.

But in a letter to the editor of UGA's student newspaperThe Red & Black, UGA President Jere Morehead said the university had "carefully considered all aspects" of a memorial constructed in 2018 to recognize and honor the legacy of individuals who were enslaved in Athens during the 19th Century.


Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Chadwick Boseman, Oprah Winfrey and Spike Lee are all graduates of historically black colleges and universities. For more than a century, HBCUs provided the foundation for countless dynamic and influential leaders. Now, some academic finance experts predict that a quarter of those schools could be gone within 20 years.


Over two rainy days in Savannah, 436 people were listed for sale to pay off the debts of the man who owned them. The 1859 event, now known as the “Weeping Time,” was the largest sale of enslaved people in American history.

This weekend, the Georgia Historical Society remembers with events in coastal Georgia.

I spoke with Weeping Time historian Dr. Kwesi DeGraft-Hanson to learn more.


Zora Neale Hurston, the celebrated Harlem Renaissance writer and anthropologist, has a new bestseller out nearly 60 years after her death. She wrote "Barracoon: The Story of The Last 'Black Cargo'" almost a century ago. It’s the nonfiction story of Oluale Kossola, the last survivor of the African slave trade in the United States. Kossola was sold into slavery and taken from West Africa when he was 19.


Vicki Scharfberg / Telfair Museums

Telfair Museums' Owens-Thomas House and Slave Quarters plans to reveal the newly-refurbished slave quarters at the Regency-era mansion to the public on Saturday, Nov. 17.

Shannon Browning-Mullis, curator of history and decorative arts for Telfair Museums, said this unveiling is a chance to finally tell the full story of the people, both free and enslaved, who lived on the property.

We spoke with her about how the museum uncovered the stories of enslaved people like Emma, the Owen's nanny, and Diane, the Owen's cook. She explained how learning about their history helps to examine the roots of inequality in American society.


Cindy Hill

Savannah’s Telfair Museums is showcasing the lives of urban enslaved people in a new exhibit opening Nov. 16.

Shannon Browning-Mullis is curator of history and decorative arts for the Telfair Museums, which operates the house. She takes us on an audio tour.


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Harvard American history professor Jill Lepore set out to explore ideas of political equality, natural rights and the sovereignty of the people in her new book. "These Truths: A History of the United States" is a civic book that views America through the promises made in the constitution.

 

She discusses transformative ideas of freedom, the evolution of voting and the dynamics of social struggle in the history of the United States.

 


Incirlik Air Base

This year is the 50th anniversary of George Romero's 1968 film, "Night of the Living Dead." While Romero's film popularized zombies as a horror trope, he's far from the first filmmaker to be enchanted by these creatures. One of the first zombie movies in the United States, "White Zombie," came out in 1934.

We spoke with Sarah Juliet Lauro about the history of zombies in popular culture. She traced their origins from the U.S. occupation of Haiti in 1915 in her book, "The Transatlantic Zombie: Slavery, Rebellion, and Living Death."

Austin History Center / Austin Public Library

June 19 is Juneteenth, the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. However, many people have never heard of the holiday or even celebrate it. Historian and storyteller Lillian Grant Baptiste joined us from Savannah to give the history of Juneteenth and why people should celebrate the holiday.


On Second Thought For Wednesday, June 6, 2018

Jun 6, 2018
GPB

The Georgia 2018 legislative session recently legalized the use of cannabis oil for treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. PTSD affects about 31 million people in the United States. The disorder is often associated with veterans, but another group of heroes — first responders — also struggle with the disorder. According to one survey, one in 15 paramedics and EMTs has attempted suicide. Heather Harp, a paramedic in Atlanta, says she and her colleagues need more support in their battle against PTSD. 

On Second Thought For Wednesday, May 30, 2018

May 30, 2018
GPB

To many Georgians, barbecue is not just food. It's a lifestyle. Over the years, barbecue has evolved in the Atlanta area. Southern folks still grill out, but in recent years the cuisine has re-emerged as an integrated bond of multiple different cultures and communities. Over the next few months, we'll explore Georgia’s greatest barbecue joints and step into their kitchens to see what makes their food different. To start off our the series, we sat down with John T. Edge. He’s the director of the Southern Foodways Alliance and author of "The Potlikker Papers: A Food History of the Modern South."

In the year since President Trump took office, a new wave of social movements has rippled across the country. March for Science Atlanta brings together scientists, data geeks and average citizens to push for policies that support and reflect research. The group will hold its annual Rally for Science April 14. The Rally for Science keynote speaker is Emory University professor Linda DeGutis. She previously served as director of the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control at the CDC. DeGutis will speak on the importance of gun violence research. We spoke with DeGutis and March for Science organizers Louis Kiphen and Allison Halterman.

Courtesy of National Memorial for Peace and Justice

The National Memorial for Peace and Justice details a painful legacy in American history: the lynchings of thousands of African-American men, women and children. 

University of Georgia Press

Modern gynecology was largely born in the antebellum South -- because some of this country’s first gynecologists conducted experiments on enslaved women.  This history is explored in a new book, “Medical Bondage: Race, Gender and The Origins Of American Gynecology.” Our guest is author Deirdre Cooper Owens, an Assistant Professor at Queens College in New York. Her book came out November 15, on the University of Georgia Press.

During an interview Monday night on Fox News, White House Chief of Staff John Kelly said that "the lack of the ability to compromise led to the Civil War."

His comment was swiftly countered by confounded observers, who pointed out that the Civil War was fought over slavery and that compromising on slavery would be morally unconscionable — and that the country did strike such compromises for decades and they did not, in fact, prevent war.

Savannah’s Owens-Thomas House was recently awarded $250,000 by the National Endowment for the Humanities. The money will continue renovations and reinterpretations of the property’s museum. We talk with Daina Berry, Associate Professor of History at the University of Texas. Berry has authored and edited a number of books on slavery in the South. We also talk to Leslie Harris, Professor of History at Northwestern University. Harris and Berry co-edited “Slavery and Freedom in Savannah.”

Emily Jones / GPB News

On Skidaway Island today, you’ll find a state park, a marine science institute, and a private golf community. But 150 years ago, right after the Civil War, it was home to a monastery and a school for former slaves. An Armstrong State University professor and a team of student archaeologists are digging up the hidden history on the site of the former school.

 

The Underground Railroad wasn’t a real railroad. There were no chugging engines or steel tracks, but there are both of those things in author Colson Whitehead’s latest novel, "The Underground Railroad." In his book, many historical details about the slave era are reimagined, and the route to freedom begins in Georgia.

For generations, U.S. presidents had slaves. Ten of the first fifteen presidents were slave owners or raised in a slaveholding household, a fact that’s often left out of history books.

WGN America

A new TV series called “Underground” premieres Wednesday night on WGN America.  It tells the story of a slave escape from a Macon, Georgia plantation in the late 1850s.

Actor Aldis Hodge of “Straight Outta Compton” stars in the series. We talk with him about how he prepared to take on the role.