sharks

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Fisheries

The Georgia Department of Natural Resources is considering changes to the rules governing shark fishing.

Two deepwater species of sharks, the Ocean Whitetip and the Shortfin Mako, would receive greater protections under the proposal. Fishing for the Whitetip would be banned entirely while Makos that are harvested would need to be larger.


COURTESY OF DISCOVERY CHANNEL

For the last 31 years, sharks have been subject to a week of media frenzy, taking place each July. But, throughout the year, they face a number of dangers that put their populations at risk.

Discovery Channel's Shark Week started Sunday and, this year, the focus is on conservation. On Second Thought dives in to explore shark facts, myths and more, from the Georgia coast to the islands of Palau. 


From the mountains to the coast to the forest, Georgia is a beautiful place for spending time outdoors.  GPB journalists are celebrating that splendor with Wild Georgia, a series of in-depth reports airing this month during Morning Edition and All Things Considered.

Ross Terrell and Emily Jones are among those working on the series, and they stopped by On Second Thought to take their stories a little deeper.  Ross talked about Atlanta’s lush tree canopy, and Emily explained how sharks sense the world around them.

 


Emily Jones / GPB News

The movie “Jaws” famously shows us a shark’s eye view of swimmers in the water, their legs kicking while the shark prepares to attack.

 

We know that sharks don’t really go after people like the movie’s monster great white. But we still have a lot to learn about how they detect their prey. A researcher at Georgia Southern University is trying to change that.

 

It turns out, understanding sharks’ senses could help people make a living on the water.


Rob Snow / OCEARCH

A scientific research vessel is expected at Savannah's port Thursday after about three weeks in the region, catching, tagging and releasing sharks.

There's a really big difference between shark fishing for research and doing it for sport: you have to keep the sharks alive, every time.


Savannah Leads Nation In Shark Fin Exports

Mar 10, 2017
geoff_in_dubai / flickr

The port of Savannah leads the nation in exports of shark fins. The legal, but controversial commodity is used for shark fin soup, popular in parts of Asia. We talked about this with Mary Landers, reporter for Savannah Morning News.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm David Greene with the story of a shark named Leonie. She's a proud mom - gave birth last year to three baby sharks. Here's the thing. She hadn't had any contact with a male shark.