segregation

CREDIT MAPPING INEQUALITY, RICHMOND UNIVERSITY

A report by financial news and content company, 24-7 Wall Street, identifies the 25 most-segregated cities in America. Four are in Georgia, and one of those is in the top five.

The area covering Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell is number 22. Columbus comes in at 19. Macon is number 11. Albany, Georgia, comes in at No. 3.


La'Raven Taylor/GPB

Has America become more racist? Earlier this year, The Pew Research Center attempted to answer that question and found that roughly two thirds of adults do think it is more common for people to express racist views since Donald Trump became president. Other long-term trends, however, suggest an overall decline in both racist views and racist acts.


There's a building on the campus of the University of Georgia where the foundation rests on the bodies of enslaved people.

That's Baldwin Hall on UGA's picturesque North Campus. It's been years since more than 100 burials of enslaved people were discovered during an expansion of the building that houses the Anthropology Department. Since then, many on campus at UGA and in the larger Athens community have not been happy with the way UGA handled those remains.


photo credit, Josh Luxenberg/Twitter

If asked about the "Plessy v. Ferguson" case, many Americans might connect the case to racial segregation. Far fewer would know the name Homer Plessy or what happened after he was arrested for refusing to leave a whites-only railway car in New Orleans the summer of 1892. 

Author and "Washington Post" editor Steve Luxenberg discovered the act of protest was decades in the making. Luxenberg joined "On Second Thought" and explained how Plessy, a fair-skinned man of African descent, was the perfect plant to challenge the constitutionality of separate rail cars in a case that made its way to the U.S. Supreme Court in 1896.


Joe H. Shipp

The Bitter Southerner recently published its first hardcover book. "A Community in Black & White: A Most Unusual Photo Album of One Southern Community" is a collection of photographs Joe Hardy Shipp took of Hickman County, Tennessee, over several decades in the mid-twentieth century.

 

His grandson, Joseph Shipp, discovered the collection, which includes thousands of black and white photographs of both black and white members of the Hickman County community. The unusual part? These photos were taken at the height of Jim Crow when white-owned businesses only served white customers. 


sweet auburn atlanta housing house apartment street
Ken Lund / Flickr

Bloomberg recently analyzed cities with more than 250,000 people across the country and determined Atlanta is the worst city for income inequality in the United States. Its report states the median income in the city is $57,000.

That's compared to what the top 5 percent of residents make, which exceeds $637,000. This gap in income is determined by factors like affordable housing, wealth accumulation and Georgia's low minimum wage.


Courtesy Kentucky National Guard

World War I, which ended with an armistice agreement 100 years ago, transformed life in the United States. The "war to end all wars" also introduced a new chapter in African-Americans' fight for equal rights. About one million African-Americans registered for the draft and nearly 370,000 African-Americans enlisted in the U.S. military during World War I. Along with the activist W.E.B. Du Bois, many of those who served hoped that a war fought in the name of democracy would, at its end, make American society truly democratic as well.

David Davis, a professor of English at Mercer University, spoke with us about the atmosphere African-Americans met overseas in the war and the environment to which they returned after the armistice. 


Mary Frances Early UGA Black African-American Graduate
University of Georgia / Twitter

The first class of women graduated from the University of Georgia in 1918, one hundred years ago. Their resiliency changed higher education, but they were segregated.

 

UGA admitted the first black woman, Charlayne Hunter-Gault, in 1961. She inspired Mary Frances Early to attend the school a year later, and Early became the first black UGA graduate. She graduated in 1962 with a master's degree in music education.

 

We spoke to her about the barriers she faced in admission, the isolation of being the only black student on campus, and the way her legacy inspires students today.

 


Courtesy Saint Lous University / Yale University Press

Jim Crow laws gave rise to horrific violence, humilitation and race-based terror, which makes "The Burning House: Jim Crow and the Making of Modern America," a new examination of segregation as a means of protecting African-American culture all the more provocative. 


 

Ross Terrell / GPB News

The Fair Housing Act is 50 years old this year. Former President Lyndon Johnson implemented this landmark piece of civil rights legislation days after Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination. King often said housing was a key victory in the struggle for African-American equity in the United States.

We spoke with Dan Immergluck, a professor in the Urban Studies Institute at Georgia State University. He discussed how legislation from 50 years ago shaped how housing in Georgia functions today.


On Second Thought For Monday, June 4, 2018

Jun 4, 2018
GPB

The 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education made segregation of America’s public schools illegal. But decades before Thurgood Marshall argued for Linda Brown's right to attend the all-white school closest to her house in Topeka, Kansas, lawsuits brought by little girls and young women chipped away at the foundations of segregated education. New research finds their grassroots efforts paved the way for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's (NAACP) legal battle to integrate schools nationally.


Image from the website of the Norman Rockwell Museum

The 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education made segregation of America’s public schools illegal. But decades before Thurgood Marshall argued for Linda Brown's right to attend the all-white school closest to her house in Topeka, Kansas, lawsuits brought by little girls and young women chipped away at the foundations of segregated education. New research finds their grassroots efforts paved the way for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's (NAACP) legal battle to integrate schools nationally. 

 


The U.S. Supreme Court issued its historic ruling Brown v. the Board of Education more than six decades ago. Linda Brown, the namesake of that landmark court case, died March 25. She was 76. 

With Brown v. Board, it became illegal to separate public school students by race. But since the landmark ruling, many schools in the South have resegregated, according to a report from the Civil Rights Project at the University of California, Los Angeles. The study also found Latino student enrollment surpassed black enrollment for the first time.

We spoke about the resegregation of southern schools with Erica Frankenberg, associate professor of education at Penn State University, Belisa Urbina, executive director of Ser Familia, and Atlanta Journal-Constitution education reporter Maureen Downey.

GPB News/Emily Cureton

In South Georgia’s Wiregrass Country, a plaque in the town of Quitman marks a hanging place. It’s where, in August of 1864, four men were executed for plotting a slave rebellion. Over the next century, mob violence against African-Americans often erupted in South Georgia.

This is where our Senior Editor Don Smith was born and raised. He moved away in 1958. Don recently went back to his hometown to mark the anniversary of the Civil War hanging, and talk with longtime residents about how they remember the county’s history of racial violence. GPB's Emily Cureton reports. 

There's a compelling question at the heart of a report released this week by the Metropolitan Planning Council: If more people — especially educated professional white Americans — knew exactly how they are harmed by the country's pervasive racial segregation, would they be moved to try to decrease it?

jontangerine / Foter

The battle for equal rights in America has centered around many modes of transportation--buses, trains, and streetcars for example. But one more form of travel should be added to that list: Airplanes. That’s the assertion of a new book from UGA Press called “Jim Crow Terminals: The Desegregation of American Airports.” The book covers the largely undocumented segregation at Southern airports in the 20th century. With us to discuss this is the author, Anke Ortlepp. She’s a Professor of North American and British History at the University of Kassel in Germany.

PATRICKPHILLIPS

In 1912, more than 1,000 black citizens were driven out of Forsyth County. Large tracts of land were seized and families were threatened with violence if they did not cooperate. Poet and author Patrick Phillips grew up in Forsyth County and documented the area’s complicated racial heritage in his new book, "Blood at the Root."

He joins us to talk about the racial climate in Forsyth and the issues that persist to this day.