Secretary of State

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Tuesday is again Election Day in Georgia with runoffs for secretary of state and a spot on the Public Service Commission. Voters will choose between Democrat John Barrow and Republican Brad Raffensberger for Brian Kemp's replacement as secretary of state and between Republican Chuck Eaton, the incumbent, and Democrat Lindy Miller for the Public Service Commission's third district. 


Candidates' websites

Whether you voted in the Midterm Elections or not, registered voters are eligible to vote in the Dec. 4 runoff for the office of secretary of state and the District 3 seat for the Public Safety Commission.

Republican Brad Raffensperger and Democrat John Barrow face off to fill the seat vacated by Brain Kemp, who won the hard-fought contest for the governorship against Democrat Stacey Abrams.

A record number of Georgians cast votes in the midterm elections this year. Contested races went into the early hours of the morning, and the contest for governor failed to produce an immediate winner.

GPB's Bill Nigut and the Atlanta Journal Constitution’s Maya Prabhu stopped by "On Second Thought" to give results and analysis of down-ballot races.

With less than a month remaining before Georgia's midterm elections, GPB's Morning Edition is taking a look at the importance of the offices on the ballot and why Georgians should turn out to vote in these races.

Powered By The People is a weekly series where GPB Atlanta host Leah Fleming speaks with political voices from around the state to give listeners a better idea about the offices that could impact their futures.

 


Joel Mclendon / Flickr/CC

A federal judge could decide as soon as tomorrow whether Georgia must switch from digital touchscreen voting machines to a paper ballot system.

A group of election integrity advocates and concerned Georgia voters say the change needs to be made before November’s election.

GPB’s Stephen Fowler was in yesterday’s hearing. He spoke to GPB's Rickey Bevington about the case.


Screenshot | GA SOS app

UPDATE 10:26 a.m. Aug. 2: The "GA SOS" app has been updated to remove all social media links to Brian Kemp from the app. 

UPDATE 6:10 p.m. July 31: Brian Kemp's campaign says the secretary of state's office will remove the links on the official app. Campaign Spokesman Ryan Mahoney: “This practice is legal and common for elected officials who value accessibility and citizen engagement. However, the links will be removed so we can focus on important issues like Stacey Abrams failing to pay her taxes."

ORIGINAL STORY:

Secretary of State Brian Kemp’s office has an official app where you can check your voter registration, register a business and see election information.

It also links to his Facebook, Twitter and Instagram, which prominently feature his campaign for Governor.

That has some ethics experts wondering if it's allowed.


WHENISCALENDARS.COM/GOOGLE IMAGES

Primary election day is May 22 and all of the state's top elected officials are on the ballot. There will be a new governor, lieutenant governor and secretary of state. Every U.S. House seat is up as well.  GPB’s Stephen Fowler has been following these races. He joined Rickey Bevington in the studio to talk about some of the challenges these offices will face, regardless of the election's outcome. 

On this edition of Political Rewind, qualifying for every race on the Georgia ballot begins today, and for the first time in recent memory, newly energized Democrats are looking to challenge GOP supremacy in the state legislature and in statewide offices.  Plus, Secretary of State Brian Kemp is bowing to pressure to change what the ACLU calls misleading voter registration forms.  Will questions about the integrity of Georgia elections hamper Kemp in his race for governor? 

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

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Georgia’s Secretary of State is in charge of its voting system. And it’s an elected office. So the person who oversees fair elections, also runs as a candidate. Is this an inherent conflict of interest? 

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It was a long day for Rex Tillerson. He spent all day yesterday answering questions from lawmakers who are trying to figure out if the Texas oil man should be the next U.S. secretary of state.

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