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  • Mayor Bottoms Testifies On Capitol Hill Today
  • Atlanta Jail Taskforce Holds First Meeting
  • Pilot Whales Beach Themselves On St. Simons Island

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Atlanta police are cracking down on scooters after at least one death and hundreds of injuries. It's illegal to ride them on sidewalks or to violate other traffic laws while riding.

The focus might be shifting to electric powered two-wheelers, but collisions involving traditional bikes, cars and pedestrians are on the rise across the U.S. and in Georgia. The Atlanta Regional Commision reports a 53% jump in such accidents between 2006 and 2015. The number of related serious injuries or fatalities went up by 26% in that time.


Christine Bernal

Live stage productions and plays can frustrate the deaf community. That’s why a pair of University of Georgia alumni decided to create their non-profit, Hands In! It’s a theater company in Athens that produces original plays in American Sign Language.

Hands In! co-founders and directors, Haley Beach and Amara Ede, want to bridge the gap between the deaf and hearing worlds by spreading awareness of ASL in dramatic media. Beach and Ede spoke with On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about their latest production, Wanderland. They also talked about their plans to expand on arts and culture for members of the deaf community. 


Georgia Department of Natural Resources

Multiple Pilot whales (Globicephala melas) repeatedly beached themselves on Georgia’s St. Simons Island Wednesday morning, according to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources. 

While most of the whales were rescued by authorities and onlookers who pulled the animals further into the water, two incapacitated whales need to be euthanized, DNR whale biologist Clay George said in a news release. These whales will be taken for a necropsy. 

  • Strip Mining Proposed Near Okefenokee National Wildfire Refuge
  • Public Service Commission Adds More Solar To Georgia Power's Energy Plan Georgia
  • Communities On Standby With Looming Threat Of ICE Raids


50 years ago today, Apollo 11 launched from Cape Kennedy. NASA allowed a film crew at the launch, documenting everything, from its preparation to mission control to the faces of the crowds witnessing the historic moment. All these pieces came together in a documentary film called Moonwalk One

David Resha, assistant professor of film studies at Emory University's Oxford College,  joined On Second Thought to discuss the cinematic elements of Moonwalk One, and why it didn't blast off at the box office. 


SAS-2018-00554 Twin Pines Minerals Standard Permit Application

A company from Alabama wants to mine for heavy minerals in South Georgia, near the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge. The Army Corps of Engineers is taking comment from the public now. GPB host Rickey Bevington spoke with reporter Emily Jones about the proposal.


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The Georgia Public Service Commission has approved the latest three-year plan for Georgia Power's energy mix. The Integrated Resource Plan, or IRP, was discussed Tuesday morning.

The utility giant will add 2,210 megawatts of renewable power procurement, the largest increase in Georgia's history. Most of that amount will be in large-scale solar power. By the end of the year, the state could have about 2,400 megawatts of renewable energy, so the newly-stipulated increase would nearly double its renewable energy capacity by the end of the three-year IRP.

Vivid ATL

Many celebrations will take place this week commemorating the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. We're focusing on Georgia connections to this amazing historical feat, along with the future of space exploration. 

Tiffany Davis is an aerospace engineer. You may have seen her on your timeline with the hashtag, #YesIAmARocketScientist. That hashtag went viral in 2016 after Davis posted it on her Instagram page, announcing her graduation from the Georgia Institute of Technology.


50 years ago today, Apollo 11 launched from Cape Kennedy. A few days later, on July 20, 1969, the first two humans landed on the moon — Commander Neil Armstrong and Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin.

Also at the launch was a film crew, documenting everything, from its preparation to mission control to the faces of the crowds witnessing the historic moment. These were mixed in with astounding footage taken by Armstrong and Aldrin, which all came together in a documentary film called Moonwalk One.


Joe Biden, left,  speaks during a presidential candidates forum in Des Moines, Iowa. Bernie Sanders, right,  participates in a rally in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Charlie Neibergall/Jacqueline Larma / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, members of Georgia’s congressional delegation respond to President Trump’s tweets urging Democratic congresswoman of color to go back where they came from.


  • Legionnaires Disease Outbreak at Atlanta Hotel
  • Moon Rocks On Display At UGA
  • Strip Mining Proposed Near Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

Consuming political news is like drinking from a firehose. Each day presents a new tweet, a new storyline and a new debate to process. It can be exhausting, and often national conversations obscure important topics like Americans’ fundamental right to vote. 

On Second Thought wants to shift the paradigm, so GPB politics reporter Stephen Fowler is presenting listeners with a segment called “Slow Democracy.” Like the slow food movement, it looks at the sources, alterations and underpinnings of participatory democracy.


How Glass On The Moon Made GPS Possible

Jul 16, 2019
Image Science and Analysis Laboratory / NASA-Johnson Space Center

Fifty years ago, Buzz Aldrin left a device on the moon that has supported Einstein’s theory of relativity and allowed GPS as we know it to be possible. 

 

The quartz glass retro-reflector array was designed by the Bendix Corporation and Heraeus, a German company with a facility in Buford that is one of the few producers of this nearly indestructible material.

 

It was one of three scientific experiments that the Apollo 11 astronauts brought with them during the first moon landing on July 20, 1969. 

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The U.S. economy is being celebrated as healthy, with many people working.

 

State economists say Georgia continues to show consistent year-over-year revenue growth, an indicator of a good economy.

 

And according to the Georgia Department of Labor, 2,600 jobs were created in May with unemployment hovering around 3.9%.   

 

But things aren’t as positive for black workers. 

Elaine Thompson / AP Photo

Georgia will see more days of extreme heat as the climate continues to warm.

A study by the advocacy group Union of Concerned Scientists finds that if nothing changes, the state will see an average of 77 days each year with a heat index over 105 degrees by the end of the century.

That's compared to an average of four days a year from 1971 to 2000.

Stephen Fowler / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Gov. Brian Kemp has nominated a veteran lawyer to serve as the judge on a new court designed to handle complex business matters. 

Walt Davis, a partner at Atlanta firm Jones Day, has been tapped to head up the new statewide business court. Georgia voters approved the court last November and the legislature codified it with bipartisan support.  

Courtesy of University of Georgia

The song "Daisy Bell" wasn't a hit in 1961, but it was a triumph. The singer? The IBM 7094, the largest, most expensive computer available at the time. And thanks to James Carmon, professor in the University of Georgia's School of Agriculture, the school purchased one in 1964.

 

Not only could the computer sing, it helped put man on the moon.

 

SAS-2018-00554 Twin Pines Minerals Standard Permit Application

An Alabama company wants to mine for heavy minerals near the Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge in southeast Georgia.

 

The proposal from Twin Pines Minerals called for mining on more than 2,414 acres of land in Charlton County. The land is home to gopher tortoises and frogs, which are endangered, but Twin Pines said it'll move them.

Plant McDonough-Atkinson in Smyrna, Ga is a natural gas plant capable of producing in excess of 2,500 MWs, enough energy to power approximately 625,000 homes.
Georgia Power

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Public Service Commission is preparing to vote on a power plan that will determine how the state generates power and how much they will produce in the years ahead. A move away from coal is a mainstay of the plan.


Wikimedia.org

Marshae Jones, an Alabama woman charged with manslaughter for allegedly starting a fight that led to her getting shot and having a miscarriage, will not face prosecution after all. The prosecutor has decided not to pursue the charge, but the incident started a conversation about negligence and culpability for pregnant women in an era of increasingly restrictive abortion laws. 

With the potential increase to the liability pregnant women face, legal questions arise surrounding when a pregnant woman is addicted to drugs. On Second Thought looked at how current and pending laws converge with Georgia’s opioid crisis.


Special Event Puts Moon Rocks On Display At UGA's Russell Library

Jul 15, 2019
Richard B. Russell Library and The Capitol Collection

The University of Georgia's Richard B. Russell Library is celebrating the 50th anniversary of the moon landing with an exhibit of rare items collected during the Apollo 11 mission. The collection includes the Georgia state flag, which traveled to the moon on the Apollo 11 spacecraft. Part of a spaceship is also on view.

On Tuesday, visitors can see the star of the show: a rock.  Specifically, it's a moon rock, which was given to the state of Georgia in 1972.


  • No Signs Of Major Immigration Enforcement In Atlanta Yet
  • Georgia Lottery Transfers More Than $1.2B To State Education Accounts
  • Crackdown On Speeding Drivers Expected This Week

An agriculture professor at the University of Georgia, James L. Carmon, talked his school into buying the costliest computer in existence in 1964 -- and it helped put a man on the moon. The computer was $3 million when the school purchased it. It’s now worth $25 million. Carmon's daughter, Lee, talked about her father's work. Atlanta Journal-Constitution writer Bo Emerson joined her on On Second Thought to talk about how the computer influenced the space race.

 

 


Public Domain

Georgia wants to encourage more students to seek agriculture jobs by offering new educational courses.

Some of the courses begin as early as kindergarten, The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported .

The goal is to better acquaint students with one of the state's oldest industries. Georgia's agriculture industry adds about $75 billion to the economy each year and provides jobs for more than 400,000 people, the newspaper reported.

  • Some Local Law Enforcement Agencies Could Get Involved In ICE Raids
  • Atlanta's Mayor Speaks Out Against Expected Immigration Crackdowns
  • Trial: LSU Frat Ordered Pledge From Georgia To Chug Liquor Before He Died


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Cooperative solar allows customers who couldn’t normally participate, those with shady yards or rental properties, to take advantage of solar.  Walton Energy Membership Corporation, which serves northeast Georgia, is attracting some big industry players with its cooperative solar program.

Facebook chose Walton EMC for a proposed 100% renewable energy data center in Newton County.

Alice Walker, the author of the The Color Purple, turns 75 this Saturday. The Georgia Writers Museum, a nonprofit organization and exhibit space that educates the public about the state’s rich literary heritage, will host a one-day celebration of Walker’s birthday. Valerie Boyd, editor of Walker’s forthcoming journals, joined On Second Thought to talk about Alice Walker’s legacy.


  • Slain Deputy Laid To Rest
  • State Senator Henson Will Not Run For Re-election
  • Braves, Dream Return To Action Tonight

Depending on who’s talking, Freaknik was a notorious public safety hazard or an annual lovefest that solidified Atlanta’s status as America’s “Black Mecca.”

Documentary filmmaker Chris Frierson joined On Second Thought to discuss the event's rise and fall, which is further detailed in his new podcast series, Freaknik: A Discourse on a Paradise Lost.


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