Savannah

Ways to Connect

David Kaminsky

Suzanne Jackson has lived a creative life. She's known for her visual art - but is also a poet, dancer, writer, radio host and has a master's in theatrical set design from Yale University.

 

Telfair Museums in Savannah is revealing a 50-year retrospective of Jackson's work. It's called, "Suzanne Jackson: Five Decades." The exhibition will begin showing this Friday. Jackson spoke with On Second Thought about her life, work and how art has always been a part of it all.

 

  • Stacey Abrams Testifies On Capitol Hill About Voting Rights
  • Atlanta Seeks Federal Help To Fend Off Cyberattacks
  • Liberty County Joins Opposition To Coastal Oil Drilling And Seismic Testing


Elizabeth Karmel/AP Images

While the particulars, origin stories and claims to be the barbecue capital of world may vary, Jim Auchmutey has found one thing we can agree on: Barbecue has a Southern accent. 

The veteran journalist and smoked meat sherpa recently wrote a new book — Smokelore: A Short History of Barbecue in America. Auchmutey stopped by On Second Thought to give a taste on what to expect from the history of barbecue.


In Search Of Flannery O'Connor's Peacocks

Jun 25, 2019
Marianna Bacallao / GPB

Once you turn onto the dirt road leading up to Andalusia, it’s easy to forget that you’re in a college town and not a rural 1950s farmland.

Flannery O’Connor’s historic home appears almost exactly as it did when she lived in Milledgeville, with a notable exception: the writer’s famous aviary, which once housed more than 40 peacocks, has been whittled down to just two of the colorful birds and moved to the opposite end of the backyard.

This month, researchers broke ground on an archaeological dig at Andalusia, hoping to find the exact location of O’Connor’s peacock pens.


On most residentially-zoned lots in American neighborhoods, it is illegal to build anything other than a single-family home. In Sandy Springs, 85% of the residential land allows for only detached, single-family homes. As Savannah updates its historic zoning laws for a modern world, residents of a newer city aren’t all ready for change.

On Second Thought explored the broader implications of the debate over ordinances in Sandy Springs with New York Times’ Writer Emily Badger and Evelyn Andrews of Reporter Newspapers.


In 2015, the first Republican presidential debate featured 17 candidates. The first Democratic presidential debates will feature 20 candidates.
Brennan Linsley / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, with the first Democratic presidential debates soon to get under way, controversies so far have plagued a small number of the crowded field of candidates. How will candidates set themselves apart and distance themselves from unfavorable headlines in hopes of coming out of the first debate unscathed? 


  • Atlanta Affordable Housing Plan Unveiled
  • Port Of Savannah Increases Capacity With New Cranes
  • Fulton County Jail Over Capacity

Ng Han Guan / AP

A Georgia city is trying to reduce its contribution to global warming by outfitting city workers with electric cars.

News outlets report the city of Savannah added two electric vehicles on Monday, with plans to grow the fleet as vehicles retire each year.

  • Atlanta Launches New Affordable Housing Plan
  • Macon Celebrates Pride Month For First Time In 20 Years
  • Dikembo Mutombo And The CDC Join Forces In Anti-Ebola Videos


Migrants watch clashes with U.S. border agents, seen from Tijuana, Mexico.
Ramon Espinosa / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the immigration community takes a sigh of relief after President Donald Trump temporarily delayed plans to round up millions of undocumented immigrants across the country. What is next for Georgia’s immigrant community?

Atlanta has one of the highest eviction rates in the country. According to Apartment List, the city ranks third in the nation — with a nearly 6% rise in evictions between 2015 and 2017. 

Earlier this month, On Second Thought spoke with Brooke Gladstone about a reporting series NPR's On The Media created with the Eviction Lab at Princeton. Our conversationon the series called, "The Scarlet E: Unmasking America's Eviction Crisis" garnered a lot of feedback from listeners so we decided to do a follow up, while getting a landlord's perspective.  

 


atlantaga.gov

  • Kemp Travels To South Korea
  • Minorities Fuel Growth In Metro Atlanta
  • Clark Atlanta University Names New President

Medicaid.georgia.gov

After 30,000 poor, elderly and disabled people were cut from Medicaid, the Department of Community Health said it would reinstate benefits to 17,000 people.

Atlanta Journal-Constitution health reporter Ariel Hart spoke with On Second Thought last week about her breaking story. On Friday, she reported that state officials still believe they properly notified most of those people before cutting their benefits, but out of “an abundance of caution” they will restart the process, said Blake Fulenwider, the agency’s chief health policy officer.

Read the story on AJC.com

Brandon Chew / NPR

Atlanta has one of the highest eviction rates in the country. According to Apartment List, the city ranks third in the nation — with a nearly 6% rise in evictions between 2015 and 2017. 

Earlier this month, On Second Thought spoke with Brooke Gladstone about a reporting series NPR's On The Media created with the Eviction Lab at Princeton. Our conversation on the series called, "The Scarlet E: Unmasking America's Eviction Crisis" garnered a lot of feedback from listeners so we decided to do a follow up, while getting a landlords perspective.  


Jack Of All Trades, Master Of Success

Jun 24, 2019

The idiom, "jack of all trades, master of none," has been a long standing driver of specialization. Success coaches have long preached the idea that specialization is the key to a prosperous career. Zigzaggers and late bloomers should take note that the numbers suggest otherwise.

David Epstein, author of Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World came to speak with On Second Thought about the advantages of being a generalist. Meet the author at 7 p.m. at Manuel's Tavern, 602 North Highland Avenue, Atlanta, GA 30307. 


VA Announces Renewed Focus On Mental Health Outreach

Jun 24, 2019

Garrett Cathcart of Atlanta waited six years after the end of his active duty military service to step into a therapist’s office.

 

He says his military training taught him to be “alpha” and “macho,” which discouraged him from expressing emotional vulnerability.

“The Army...does an amazing job of creating a soldier,” Cathcart said, “not so hot on taking a soldier and turning him back into a civilian.”

 

Veterans Affairs wants to change that going forward.

jekyllislandfoundation.org

The agency that manages Jekyll Island on the Georgia coast is raising parking fees at the state park by $2.

That means beginning July 1 it will cost $8 to drive a vehicle onto the island state park. The Jekyll Island Authority's governing board approved the fee increase during its meeting Tuesday.

In this week’s Medical Minute, Dr. Joseph Hobbs, chairman of the Department of Family Medicine at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University, discusses a gene that seems to be an indicator of how long people diagnosed with advanced stage colorectal cancer might survive. 

The Medical Minute airs at 8:18 a.m., 1:20 p.m. and 5:18 p.m. every Saturday and Sunday on the 17 GPB radio stations across Georgia. For more Medical Minute episodes, visit the GPB Augusta SoundCloud page.

  • Atlanta Could See Targeted Arrests By ICE Agents Next Week
  • Savannah State Athletics Program On Probation For NCAA Violations
  • Atlanta Could Turn Part Of Downtown To Pedestrian-Only Plaza


Neighbors are still missing their newly retired mailman.

Floyd Martin was a beloved mail carrier who worked the same route in Marietta for nearly 35 years. So beloved, in fact, that when he retired a few weeks ago, the community he served so well started a GoFundMe page to send him to Hawaii. Delta Air Lines pitched in too — providing airfare. 

 

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, racial issues continue to dominate the headlines this week as candidates aim to court African-American voters in the south.


atlantaga.gov

  • Another Measles Case In Georgia
  • Some Georgia Students To Receive Loan Relief
  • Hawks Nab Two Top Prospects In NBA Draft

Jennifer Brett

Neighbors are still missing their newly retired mailman.

Floyd Martin was a beloved mail carrier who worked the same route in Marietta for nearly 35 years. So beloved, in fact, that when he retired a few weeks ago, the community he served so well started a GoFundMe page to send him to Hawaii. Delta Air Lines pitched in too — providing airfare. 

Known as "Mister Floyd" to his Marietta residents, Floyd Martin joined On Second Thought in the studio to reflect on his life and career with the postal service.


Stavrialena Gontzou / Unsplash.com

Celebrations continue across the country as the LGBTQ community celebrates Pride Month.

President Bill Clinton declared June as “Gay & Lesbian Pride Month” in 2000. The designation commemorated the Stonewall Riots in Lower Manhattan in June of 1969. Nine years later, President Barack Obama included bisexual and transgender people — the “B” and “T” of LGBT.

Nowadays, rainbow flags are in front yards, tourism posters, along with sponsorship banners and ad campaigns. With brands like Campbell’s Soup, Apple, and Taylor Swift feeling comfortable aligning themselves with Pride, On Second Thought sat down with Georgian members of the LGBTQ community for a conversation about the history of Pride and how corporate commodification has changed the event over time.

Picserver

Some students in Georgia will receive debt relief for private loans they took out to attend a failed for-profit school.

According to a press release from Attorney General Chris Carr's office, 471 former ITT Tech students in Georgia will receive $4,171,314.43 in debt relief for loans obtained to attend the school. 

 


GPB Evening Headlines For June 20, 2019

Jun 20, 2019

  • Some Georgia Students To Recieve Debt Relief In ITT Settlement
  • World Refugee Day Honors Those Displaced, Including People Resettled In Georgia 
  • Parole Board Denies Clemency To Man On Death Row

facebook.com/scadmoa

Whether you're into the arts, crafts or live music scene, there's a plethora of events to choose from in Savannah this weekend.

Claire Sandow of the Tourism Leadership Council and Anna Chandler of Savannah Magazine have your guide. 


atlantaga.gov

  • Clemency Denied For Condemned Inmate
  • Georgia Driver's Licenses Get Security Upgrade
  • Hawks Have Two 1st Round Picks In Tonight's NBA Draft

Tom E. Puskar / AP

The state health department on Thursday confirmed the seventh case of measles in Georgia this year.

An unvaccinated metro Atlanta resident was diagnosed with measles after traveling overseas, Department of Public Health spokeswoman Nancy Nydam said.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

June 20 marks World Refugee Day. The United Nations defines refugees as people forced to flee their native countries "because of persecution, war or violence." On Second Thought covered a variety of aspects of the refugee experience in Georgia. 


Pages