Savannah

Ways to Connect

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

One of the bands performing this year at the Stopover Music Festival in Savannah is Culture Vulture. The trio describes themselves as an instrumental pop outfit with heavy math rock and jazz influence. They give us a special studio performance and talk about their style of music.

Adriana Iris Boatwright / DO Savannah

Bill Dawers, editor of the music blog Hissing Lawns and columnist for the Savannah Morning News, and Mahogany Bowers, founder of Blessings in a Bookbag, offer up some ways to have fun in Savannah this weekend.

Mahogany’s picks:

Street Clothes

Ahead of this week’s Stopover Music Festival in Savannah, we talk to one of the event’s featured artists for the Georgia Playlist. 

    

Andy Sutphen of the Savannah group Street Clothes tells us about two of his favorite songs by Georgia artists.

The Savannah Bananas

This is the first year since 1996 that the Sand Gnats baseball team will not play in Savannah. The team moved to South Carolina last year and changed their name to the Columbia Fireflies. But Savannah has a new baseball team to play inside Grayson Stadium, and that team finally has a name: The Bananas.

Do you like the team name? Or is it ridiculous? What's your favorite wacky sports team name?

We kick off our week of coverage of Savannah’s Stopover Music Festival with a Georgia Playlist from one of the artists performing. 

Anna Chandler of the Savannah-based band COEDS picks two songs from Atlanta’s Cat Power and The Gerbils of Athens.

RICHARD SHIRO / AP

Funeral services for author Pat Conroy are expected to draw thousands of people in South Carolina's Lowcountry Monday and Tuesday.
 

    

 The best-selling author of "The Prince of Tides" and "The Great Santini" died Friday, just weeks after announcing he'd been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer.

Funeral director Carla Anderson-Smith tells the Beaufort Gazette she's expecting 1,500 to 2,000 people to turn out to pay their respects to the beloved author.

MercyMovement.com

 

If you begin to see an a growing unfamiliar faces in your neighborhood, US Attorney Edward Tarver says don’t ignore it. You could be a witness to sex trafficking.

 

The Center for Public policy studies calls Georgia a major human trafficking destination.

 

Two years ago 12 victims were rescued from a sex trafficking that spanned from Mexico to Savannah.

 

Davenport House Museum

Marcia Banes, events editor for South Magazine, and Molly Swagler, vice president of the Tourism Leadership Council, offer up some ways to have fun in Savannah this weekend.

Molly's picks: 

-In the market for a boat, or just a fan? Check out the Savannah Boat Show at the convention center. The event features Capt. Paul Herbert of National Geographic's "Wicked Tuna." Friday, 12-6 p.m. and Saturday, 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; $10 adults, $5 children, military, seniors.

Emily Jones / GPB News

St. Simons Island could become Georgia’s next city. It attracts a lot of development. And some residents think only a local city government can make sure developers preserve the island’s character. But as GPB’s Emily Jones reports, not everyone is sold.

 

 

 

  When you drive around St. Simon’s Island, it’s easy to see why people love it. Old live oaks twist and spread their limbs over the roads, with tiny cottages tucked between them.

Gullah Geechee File Suit To Stay On Sapelo Island

Dec 9, 2015
Sam Whitehead / GPB

Members of Sapelo Island’s Gullah Geechee community are suing local and state governments for practices they say are threatening their ability to live on land they've called home for generations.

Reed Colfax is an attorney representing the group and says many are descendants of slaves.

“When those slaves were freed after the Civil War, many started creating their own communities, had their own lives,” he says. “It was an extraordinary thing, and it's being ignored now.”

 

Opera star Jessye Norman attends an event at the Warner Theatre on Saturday, Jan. 17, 2009 in Washington.
Evan Agostini / AP

Jessye Norman, a native of Augusta, grew from a foundation built on the streets, schools, and churches of the Central Savannah River Area. Norman has become an internationally admired dramatic soprano and arts education advocate.

She sat down in the performance hall of the school that bears her name, The Jessye Norman School of The Arts, to speak with Brenda Durant, Executive Director of The Greater Augusta Arts Council.

Gabrielle Ware / GPB

Daufuskie island's population peaked in the 1940s with more than a thousand residents, mostly descendants of freed slaves brought to the coast to harvest rice and sea cotton.

Today, this quiet community has less than 100 people and is nestled between Savannah, Georgia and Hilton Head, South Carolina. Once, Daufuskie Island was a home to Gullah people from all over the low country but when Daufuskie Island's booming oyster industry came to an end in the 1950’s after the beds were poisoned by pollution in the Savannah River, the population began to dwindle.

When it rains on Sapelo Island, it doesn’t take long for the roads to turn into mud according to Gullah resident Stacey Grovner.

“Back in March we had a torrential downpour over a week long period; we got over 11 inches of rain over one week. The roads were like soup.”

  Sapelo Island, Georgia is a coastal community with rich wildlife, an enviable coastline and towering moss draped trees. It’s no wonder many choose the location for vacations and second homes.

What you may not know is the island is also home to the last intact Gullah Geechee community.

When it comes to sheer vocal opulence, it's tough to top Jessye Norman. There's a majesty and intimacy in her voice — immense as the Grand Canyon yet warm and confidential. The five-time Grammy winner is one of the most celebrated opera singers of our time.

Jessye Norman's commanding soprano voice makes her the quintessential operatic diva for many listeners. But she frequently draws inspirations from jazz: She ranks singers like Billie Holiday, Mabel Mercer and Sarah Vaughan high on her list of influences.

A 2006 Favorite: Opera Diva Jessye Norman

Dec 29, 2006

Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

FARAI CHIDEYA, host:

And here's our very last of our favorites for 2006. This story about two musicians mixing their art with education.

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