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Jason Reynolds didn't get through a whole book until he was 17. He's now a bestselling author, and he's trying to change the way young people feel about reading.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

The sidewalks in front of Rep. Lucy McBath's (D-Marietta) office in Sandy Springs were awash Tuesday with dueling signs and slogans voicing opinions on the ever-evolving impeachment talks in Washington, D.C.

The White House said Tuesday it will not participate in the ongoing impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump's pressure on Ukraine to investigate former Vice President Joe Biden.


Little Shop of Stories is bringing best-selling New York Times author Jason Reynolds to Decatur at the Holy Trinity Episcopal Parish on Thursday, Oct. 10 at 7 p.m.  Hear how Reynolds inspires young readers with contemporary stories that deal with real-world issues.


  • November Democratic Presidential Candidates Debate To Be In Georgia
  • U.S. Supreme Court Considers Georgia LGBTQ Employee Rights Case
  • Win Or Go Home For Braves And Cardinals This Afternoon

Tony Dejak / AP

The Georgia Department of Public Health has issued a health advisory following the death of a second person here in Georgia connected to vaping and the use of e-cigarettes. That person had a history of nicotine vaping and DPH does not yet know whether other substances were used.

  • Georgia Man At Center Of Supreme Court Hearing On LGBT Rights
  • Jimmy Carter Comments On Ongoing Impeachment Inquiry
  • Lung Illness Reports Are 'Tip Of The Iceberg,' CDC Says


John Amis / AP

Former President Jimmy Carter is weighing in on the House impeachment inquiry after learning of the Trump administration’s decision to block a U.S. diplomat from speaking with lawmakers about his alleged involvement in President Donald Trump’s request for a foreign official to investigate a domestic political opponent.

Carter said the White House was “trying to stonewall” the inquiry by blocking officials from cooperating.

Democratic presidential candidates at a Democratic presidential primary debate in Houston. The DNC announced Georgia will host a debate on Nov. 20.
DAVID J. PHILLIP / AP

The road to the Democratic presidential nomination will run through Georgia, as the state will host the next primary debate on Nov. 20.

While the exact location, panelists and final list of qualified candidates is not yet known, the Democratic National Committee announced Tuesday that MSNBC and The Washington Post will co-host the debate. 

State party leaders said the decision to bring White House hopefuls to Georgia signals the prominent role the state will have in the 2020 elections. 

Mark Humphrey / AP

Today on Political Rewind, our panel weighs in on former President Jimmy Carter's comments on the current impeachment inquiry in an interview with NBC's Andrea Mitchell. What did one of the Peach State's favorite sons have to say about President Donald Trump?


The U.S. Supreme Court building at dusk, Thursday, May 23, 2019, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Patrick Semansky

The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments Tuesday in a potential landmark case that could decide whether lesbian, gay, and transgender people are protected under the federal discrimination law.

“It has the potential of ensuring and affirming that LGBT people are protected against employment discrimination under the current federal provisions of sex discrimination,” Jeff Graham, executive director of Georgia Equality, said.


  • Georgia's New Voting Machines Previewed In Perry
  • Funeral Plans In Augusta For Jessye Norman Announced
  • Braves Lose To Cardinals In Game 4 of NLDS

Andrew Harnik / AP

So far, 18 people have died, including one Georgian, and more than 1,000 people have been suddenly sickened with severe lung illness related to using electronic cigarettes, health officials say.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Principal Deputy Secretary Dr. Anne Schuchat said during the Oct. 3 update that the latest numbers indicate the problem is only growing worse. 


JAE C. HONG / ASSOCIATED PRESS

"The Beverly Hillbillies" introduced audiences to the Clampett family in the 1960s and helped popularize the stereotype of the "Dumb Southerner." The myth persists today, wrapped up with ideas about tolerance, race and intelligence.

Marie T. Cochran, director of the Affrilachia Artist Project, joined On Second Thought to dig into this idea and her experiences growing up in Appalachia. Chuck Reece, host of The Bitter Southerner Podcast, also joined the conversation.


Sr. Helen Prejean is one of the most powerful advocates today for abolishing the death penalty. Her book, Dead Man Walking, has become a movie and an opera. Hear Sr. Helen’s story firsthand.


Elijah Nouvelage / Invision/AP

Film producer and Atlanta resident Tyler Perry recently celebrated the opening of his new studios with a black-tie event Saturday evening. The new facility is located on the grounds of the historic former Fort McPherson Army base.

Mark Humphrey / AP

With a bandage above his left eye and a large, red welt below it, former President Jimmy Carter was greeted by a cheering crowd Monday morning as he prepared to help build a home with Habitat for Humanity in Nashville.

Morehouse College

Oprah Winfrey is making another large donation to one of Atlanta's historic black colleges and universities.

 

Morehouse College is set to receive a $13 million gift from the television icon as part of the 30th anniversary of the Oprah Winfrey Scholars Program.

 

 


Jessye Norman performing during The Dream Concert at Radio City Music Hall in New York. Norman died, Monday, Sept. 30, 2019, at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s Hospital in New York. She was 74.
Jason DeCrow / AP

The public funeral for opera star Jessye Norman has been set for Saturday in Georgia and will feature tributes from actor Laurence Fishburne, civil rights activist Vernon Jordan and Tony Award-winner Audra McDonald.

The funeral will be at the William B. Bell Auditorium in Augusta. A private interment will follow. There are two public viewings — on Thursday and Friday.

  • GA Supreme Court Asks For More Judicial Review Of Gun Rules At Atlanta Botanical Garden
  • State Remains Dry, But More Fall-Like Weather On The Way
  • Former Coastal Police Officer Found Not Guilty Of Manslaughter


student looking at art in a museum
AUC Collective

If you go into an art museum in North America, chances are the staff, the curators and the directors are going to be white.

In 2015, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation study found 72% of the staff of museums belonging to the Association of Art Museum Directors was non-Hispanic white.

Now, the Atlanta University Center wants to train the next generation of African American art historians and museum curators.


Brandon Ogden / PBS

In this age of divisive politics and news, a new PBS series from GPB questions the premise that this is the worst it’s ever been in American history.

Retro Report on PBS aims to widen the conversation, exploring the origins of issues and ideas that continue to replay in our headlines and culture.

The hosts of Retro Report, Masud Olufani and former OST host Celeste Headlee, joined On Second Thought to share what’s in store for viewers.


Erin Schilling / University of Georgia

Students from the University of Georgia's photojournalism program spent Saturday at the Georgia National Fairgrounds working with nine professional coaches as part of a class project to document the 30th anniversary of the fair.

Meg Kinnard / AP

On this edition of Political Rewind, Speaker of the U.S. House Nancy Pelosi visits Atlanta and tells reporters Georgia will not be neglected by national Democrats in 2020 races. She also defends her decision to launch the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump after months of hesitation.

The AJC’s Jim Galloway and GBP’s Robert Jimison were among the few journalists who had the opportunity to speak with her. 


Premiering tonight, Retro Report on PBS questions the premise that the modern American political divide is a new one. The series explores the historical origins of issues and ideas that continue to replay in our headlines and culture today. On Second Thought got a preview of the series with the hosts, Masud Olafani and former OST host Celeste Headlee. 

Retro Report premieres tonight at 9 p.m. on Georgia Public Broadcasting Television. 


Left, Rep. Doug Collins, ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, speaks during a hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington. Right, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi announcing a formal impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump.
Patrick Semansky/Andrew Harnik / AP

Rep. Doug Collins (R-Gainesville) is one of Georgia’s top Republicans in the House, and as such is leading the charge as one of President Donald Trump’s chief defenders during the ongoing impeachment inquiry on Capitol Hill.

Ross Terrell / GPB News

The smell hits you before anything else. Rows of green plants sprout from brown dirt, covered by a white tarp.

It’s the first legal industrial hemp field in the state of Georgia in decades. Congress outlawed the plant with the Controlled Substance Act of 1970, which classified it as a schedule one drug.

  • Tyler Perry Opens New Studio
  • Shark Fishing Rules Altered
  • Braves Notch Come From Behind Victory In NLDS

Wikimedia Commons

A monumental policy change of University System of Georgia health insurance is now allowing transgender employees to complete gender-affirmation surgery. 

The change in coverage came in response to a lawsuit filed by Skyler Jay, a University of Georgia employee, against USG and BlueCross BlueShield, his health insurance provider.

drought in Atlanta
DAVID GOLDMAN / AP

It's just a week into October, but it’s been already been a record-breaking month when it comes to high temperatures. 

Atlanta, Athens and Macon saw all-time highs last week.  


House Speaker Nancy Pelosi speaking with reporters in Atlanta on Friday, Oct. 5.
Robert Jimison / GPB News

During a trip to Atlanta, U.S. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi shared her plans to protect Congressional seats held by Democrats in the state, aggressively target open seats and how those priorities will help progressive candidates for Georgia’s two Senate seats.

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