religious liberty

DAVID GOLDMAN / AP PHOTO

A new front has opened in the ongoing "religious liberty" legislative battle, this time over religious expression in schools.

On Monday, State Rep. Kasey Carpenter, a Dalton Republican, filed House Bill 53 known as ‘The Student and Educator Faith Protection Act,’ the first religious liberty measure to be put forth during the 2019 state legislative session.

GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, House of Representatives Speaker David Ralston joins us just days before he gavels in the 2019 Session.

 

Political Rewind: Kemp Lays Out His Agenda

Nov 20, 2018
In a file photo, now Governor-elect Brian Kemp gives a thumbs-up to supporters, Wednesday, Nov. 7, 2018, in Athens, Ga.
John Bazemore / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Governor-elect Brian Kemp lays out the basics of his policy agenda.


Emily Cureton

On this edition of Political Rewind, we talk with former Georgia Congressman Jack Kingston.  He's making national headlines for comments calling into question the motives of students mobilizing for gun reform.  Also, as President Trump takes his first steps to improve gun safety, a very large group rallies at the Georgia State Capitol calling for gun control.  Plus, Republican leaders at the State Capitol reach an agreement to cut taxes on Georgians by half a billion dollars in the next five years.  What led to them to act now, despite initial concerns from the governor?  And, a bill to all

(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia Senator David Perdue puts himself front and center in one of the biggest controversies of the Trump presidency.  What does Perdue gain or lose by defending the president?  Plus, as members of Congress jockey over extending DACA and building a border wall, the deadline for passing a government spending bill hangs in the balance.  If there is a government shutdown this weekend, who will get the blame?  Then, a coalition of faith-based organizations put a controversial religious liberty bill back in play at the state capital.  What’s likely to happe

On this edition of "Political Rewind," as the 2018 Georgia legislative session approaches, we’re joined by Speaker of the House of Representatives David Ralston. What does he see as the most compelling issues legislators will face? What about a plan to deal with sexual harassment under the Gold Dome? Will the speaker once again look to tamp down efforts to pass a religious liberty bill? And, what about the calls for the legislature to relinquish control over the fate of Confederate markers in local communities?

Panelists:

AP Photos (David Goldman)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," did President Donald Trump admit to obstructing justice on Twitter?  Also, the controversial Republican tax reform bill passes the Senate, but it does not include a measure that would have benefited Georgia-based Delta Air Lines. The Supreme Court gets set to hear the so-called “wedding cake” case. How will the ruling impact Georgia, a state that continues to flirt with passing a religious liberty statute and one that has a large LGBT community?

Are some of the Republican Party’s top stars beginning to pave the way to run for president in 2020 if Donald Trump steps aside? On today’s show we’ll talk about a New York Times report that Vice President Mike Pence, Ohio Governor John Kasich, and senators Tom Cotton and Ben Sasse are beginning to make the kind of moves that could position them to be ready for a run.  The story has infuriated the Vice President, who says it’s not true. But is it? Our panel weighs in.

Mandel Ngan / AFP/Getty Images

President Trump signed an executive order Thursday relaxing political restrictions on religious groups. Among other provisions, Trump directs the IRS to ease up on faith-based organizations who may have had their tax-exempt status threatened for supporting a particular candidate. NPR reporters annotate the order, adding context and analysis.

Adapted from MartialArtsNomad.com

On this edition, we present a “Political Rewind” exclusive: a debate between Columbus state senator Josh McKoon, the hardest driving proponent of religious liberty measures in the state legislature and former spokesman for Governor Deal Brian Robinson.

Commentary: Pastor Feels Betrayed By Religious Liberty Veto

Apr 12, 2016
Garland Hunt

Gov. Nathan Deal's veto last month of Georgia's religious liberty bill continues to spark a flurry of responses. The measure would have allowed faith-based groups to refuse service to same-sex couples and LBGT citizens.  Big businesses and Hollywood praised the decision, but many people in the religious community, like Garland Hunt, felt betrayed.

James Patterson / AP Images for Human Rights Campaign

On today’s show, our panel of insiders will look at the storm of controversy that has erupted around new religious liberty laws in Mississippi and North Carolina. Both states passed the measures just days after Georgia governor Nathan Deal vetoed a religious liberty bill here.

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi's governor has signed a law that allows public and private businesses to refuse service to gay couples based on the employers' religious beliefs.

Gov. Phil Bryant signed House Bill 1523 on Tuesday, despite opposition from gay-rights groups and some businesses. Some conservative and religious groups support the bill.

pixbay.com

Governor Nathan Deal recently rejected controversial ‘religious liberties’ legislation that created a nationwide uproar. Alongside outcry from social activists who say the bill legalized discrimination against LGBT people, production companies for TV and film vowed to end their association with Georgia if the bill became law. Many feel that Hollywood’s billions ultimately defeated the fledgling bill, but did social activism play an equal or greater role?

David Goldman / AP

Lt. Governor Casey Cagle and House Speaker David Ralston say there will be no special session to override Governor Nathan Deal’s veto of a religious liberty bill. Both leaders would like to take another pass on the bill in the next legislative session.

Trevor Young / GPB

There’s been a tremendous backlash in the conservative faith community after Governor Deal announced he will veto the “religious liberty” bill. Our panel of insiders discusses how the governor came to his decision and what supporters of the bill plan to do next to give the measure new life.

Jamelle Bouie / Flickr/CC

Georgia's controversial religious liberty bill is now in the hands of Gov. Nathan Deal and he’s under enormous pressure from both sides of the hot-button issue.

A last ditch effort to draft new legislation and revise parts of House Bill 757 during the final hours of the session Thursday night failed.

Sam Whitehead / GPB

Five members of the state House Democratic Caucus, including Georgia's three openly gay legislators, called on Gov. Nathan Deal Monday to veto HB 757.

 The bill, which currently awaits his signature, would allow faith-based organizations to deny services to same-sex couples.