recipes

Matthew Terrell

Long before blockbuster cookbooks, community recipe collections were go-to references for recipes. These compilations were fundraising tools for church and junior league groups, Girl Scout troops and 4-H clubs.

Matthew Terrell is an artist and writer living in Atlanta. His book, The Magnolia Bayou Ladies Auxiliary Country Club Cooking and Entertaining Book, picks up the spiral-bound, D.I.Y Southern tradition, but this time there is a twist. This cookbook is fiction. While the recipes are real, everything else — the stories, the characters, the commentary, the ads — are fake.


Andrew Thomas Lee

From Summer blueberry to Thanksgiving pumpkin, pies are packed with memories and traditions. Everyone has their favorite, but you may not be experiencing everything this “infinite dessert” has to offer.

Paul Arguin and Chris Taylor, a married pair of scientists from the CDC turned pie-baking champions, encourage you to escape the flaky crust rut of making the same old pie, with their cookbook The New Pie.

Courtesy of Ten Speed Press

Ernest Matthew Mickler's White Trash Cooking was released in 1986 to mixed reviews. Some of the recipes in the cookbook include "Uncle Willie's Swamp Cabbage Stew," "Rabbit Pie" and "Broiled Squirrel." Critics wondered if the book was for shock value or if it was just another elitist dig at poor southerners.  

Michael Adno's profile of Mickler portrays a man who took pride in his disappearing southern heritage and in the food served by his Florida relatives and neighbors —the same people he felt rejected by as a gay man.