racism

Grant Blankenship / GPB

You probably saw the photo. 

A woman with her right hand raised in a fist, her left on the autobiography of Malcolm X. That was Mariah Parker. 


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The latest in our Macon Conversations series: Meet Charise Stephens and Scott Mitchell. In their conversation, Charise and Scott tackle the challenges of overcoming the prejudice you are raised with.

Roseanne And Racism

May 30, 2018
(Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP)

On this edition of Political Rewind, ABC’s firing of Roseanne Barr over her Twitter bullying of Valerie Jarrett is the hottest topic in the country today. Why can’t we erase the stain of racism that continues to plague us? Do Southerners have a unique perspective on the problem? Our panel weighs in on what may be the thorniest issue in American life. Also, Republicans have begun their effort to paint Stacey Abrams in a negative light, pushing her to release her tax returns and explain her financial problems. Meanwhile, Casey Cagle begins his TV campaign to win the GOP runoff with a sunny message from his wife. How will Brian Kemp respond?


On Second Thought For Wednesday, May 23, 2018

May 23, 2018

After writing his New York Times op-ed, “Dear White America," George Yancy received hundreds of hateful messages. Yancy, an Emory University professor of philosophy, knew that his letter was controversial, but he says he never thought he would receive literal death threats. This past April, he released his newest book, "Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly About Racism in America." It addresses how people confronted him after the publication of his op-ed, and how to proceed from there. In his book, he asks white Americans to rise above their initial racial response and have empathy for the African-American community. George Yancy joined us in studio to talk about "Backlash."

Courtesy Rowman & Littlefield Publishers

After writing his New York Times op-ed, “Dear White America," George Yancy received hundreds of hateful messages. Yancy, an Emory University professor of philosophy, knew that his letter was controversial, but he says he never thought he would receive literal death threats.

This past April, he released his newest book, "Backlash: What Happens When We Talk Honestly About Racism in America."

Courtesy of the Robo Sapiens

A group of middle school students from Dacula, Georgia, is preparing for a world championship. This weekend the “Robo Sapiens” will head to Louisville, Kentucky for the 2018 VEX Robotics World Championship, where they will present the findings of their latest research on racist robots and bias in artificial intelligence.

www.julielythcotthaims.com

Julie Lythcott-Haims is the seventh generation of her family to grow up in the United States.  And yet, she is still asked, over and over: “Where are you really from?” She responds eloquently in her new memoir: “Real American.”

Beverly Daniel Tatum leads frank conversations about race. Back in 1997, the former Spelman College President wrote a book called,  “Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?” Now, she’s updated the text. We caught up with her to mark the 20th anniversary edition.

Atlanta History Center

Former Spelman College President Beverly Daniel Tatum  is on a long quest to understand of psychology of racism. In 1997, she wrote a book about called ”Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria: And Other Conversations About Race.” Twenty years later, Tatum has updated the book. We talk with her ahead of an appearance Tuesday night, September 26, at the Atlanta History Center.

For the first time in over four decades, West Point authorized an updated text on military history in 2014. This one focuses on the tactics and consequences of the Civil War. We revisit a conversation with Colonel Ty Seidule, one of the book’s editors.

The recent violence in Charlottesville, Va., amplified an ongoing struggle in America about who experiences discrimination and to what extent. Many of the white nationalists who rallied in Charlottesville, for example, feel that white people are discriminated against as much as, or more than, minority groups.

Wesleyan College Deals With KKK Ties

Jul 26, 2017
drivebybiscuits1 / Foter

Wesleyan College in Macon is looking to apologize for past ties to racism, slavery, and the Ku Klux Klan. Information about the school’s history came to light recently through the research of students at Wesleyan. This comes just months after an incident involving racist graffiti on a dorm room wall.

Malingering / Flickr

A recent article from The New Yorker magazine called barbecue the most political food in America. The author argues barbecue has its roots in racism and discrimination. We discuss this history with Chuck Reece, editor of the Bitter Southerner. Also joining us are food writers Michael Twitty, and Kathleen Purvis of the Charlotte Observer.

Is Organized White Supremacy On The Rise?

Apr 6, 2017

We’ve seen more acts of hate speech and racism in recent months. Are hate groups becoming more organized? Jeannine Bell, Professor of Law at Indiana University, and filmmaker Mike Ramsdell joined us to discuss the rise of white supremacy, and what we’ve learned from dealing with hate groups in our history.

 

This year marks the 50th anniversary of “Foxfire,” a collection of traditions from the folk cultures of the Appalachian Mountains. To commemorate half a century of research into the North Georgia communities, a new exhibit has opened at the University of Georgia in Athens. We speak with Mary Miller, who spearheaded the exhibition, and one of the students who contributed to its development.

Brown University Library

Watermelon season is almost over. It was once a symbol of pride for freed slaves, but it's since taken on all kinds of racial meanings. We talk about the fruit's history as a racist stereotype with Pat Turner, a professor of African American Studies at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

A string of small arsons and racist graffiti at Mercer University in Macon are distracting students at the end of the semester when they would otherwise be worried about finals.

The graffiti was both written and removed Wednesday night on doors in Sherwood Hall, a co-ed freshman dormitory.  Freshman finance and accounting major Kenny Olaganju didn’t see the graffiti before it was removed, but he heard about it.

“All that I heard is that someone went through on the first floor and wrote the N-word with a hard R on peoples’ doors,” he said