Public Service Commission

SARAH ROSE / GPBNEWS

The Public Service Commission on Monday began public hearings on a proposed rate hike by Georgia Power. If approved, it would raise monthly service fees by nearly 80%. 


Brendan Wood / Flickr

This week, Georgia's Public Service Commission will begin a new round of hearings in Atlanta on a proposed rate hike for Georgia Power customers.

 

The average user would pay an extra $200 dollars annually under the potential rate increase.

 


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The Georgia Public Service Commission has approved the latest three-year plan for Georgia Power's energy mix. The Integrated Resource Plan, or IRP, was discussed Tuesday morning.

The utility giant will add 2,210 megawatts of renewable power procurement, the largest increase in Georgia's history. Most of that amount will be in large-scale solar power. By the end of the year, the state could have about 2,400 megawatts of renewable energy, so the newly-stipulated increase would nearly double its renewable energy capacity by the end of the three-year IRP.

John Amis / AP

Georgia Power has asked for permission to go up on its prices.

The Savannah Morning News reports the utility is seeking to increase customer rates by about 7% in 2020.

Left Republican Brad Raffensperger won the runoff race for Secretary of State. Right Republican Incumbent Chuck Eaton retained his seaton on the Public Service Commission.
Brad Raffensperger Campaign, Georgia Public Service Commission

On this edition of Political Rewind, voting has ended for the 2018 runoffs and Republicans have declared victory in the secretary of state and Public Service Commissioner races. 


GPB

Tuesday is again Election Day in Georgia with runoffs for secretary of state and a spot on the Public Service Commission. Voters will choose between Democrat John Barrow and Republican Brad Raffensberger for Brian Kemp's replacement as secretary of state and between Republican Chuck Eaton, the incumbent, and Democrat Lindy Miller for the Public Service Commission's third district. 


The Atlanta Press Club Runoff Debates were held Nov. 2 for Public Service Commission District 3 and Secretary of State.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Transparency, utility rates and the future of Georgia’s behind-schedule and over-budget nuclear power plant construction were all big topics during the Oct. 2 Atlanta Press Club Debates for Public Service Commission District 3 and District 5.

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, after running three years behind and several billion dollars over budget, partners in Georgia Powers Plant Vogtle Nuclear Plant vote to continue funding the expansion project. Critics have fought against Vogtle's expansion, citing cost and safety concerns. We discuss whether or not the future of the project is in danger. 


(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgians will continue to pay for an expansion of the Plant Vogtle nuclear power facility, thanks to a ruling by the Public Service Commission. Our panel will weigh in on how much we’ll pay and look at why the decision has sparked controversy. Plus, state legislators are considering a new tax on phones, television subscriptions and streaming services like Netflix. We’ll discuss the reasons. And, the U.S. Ambassador to the U.N.

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Georgia consumers will have to pay more for power, starting in 2021, now that state regulators have voted to let construction continue on two nuclear reactors at Plant Vogtle near Augusta.

At a hearing Thursday, the Georgia Public Service Commission voted unanimously in favor of continuing construction at Plant Vogtle.

This is despite the project being billions of dollars over budget and years behind schedule.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

Georgia Power’s expansion of nuclear power at Plant Vogtle is still alive following a unanimous vote by the state’s Public Service Commission.

(AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," the Public Service Commission is about to make a momentous decision that will hit Georgia Power customers in the pocketbook and influence the future of nuclear power across the country. Will the PSC uphold Georgia Power’s plan to continue construction of the troubled Plant Vogtle? Will the commission approve a power company proposal to increase the surcharge customers are already paying for building the nuclear plant? Plus, we’ll look at the fallout from the blackout at Hartsfield-Jackson Airport.

Construction At Plant Vogtle Continues, For Now

Mar 30, 2017
Georgia Power

Work at Georgia Power’s Plant Vogtle will continue for at least the next 30 days.

That’s the word from the utility a day after Westinghouse, the contractor building two new reactors at the nuclear facility, declared bankruptcy.