Public Health

CDC Foundation

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta may not be top of mind until we hear about an infectious disease outbreak or see images of scientists in hazmat suits in the news. But the work of health leaders and innovators goes on outside of headline-level crises.

The people advocating for public health and the important causes they’re addressing are the focus of a podcast from the CDC Foundation.

Claire Stinson is host of Contagious Conversations and she visited On Second Thought to talk about her work.

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

Georgia leaders have room for improvement when it comes to preparing the state for public health emergencies, according to a report released Tuesday by Trust For America’s Health.

Pixabay

A lot of Americans feel lonely – between one-third and half, depending on which research you consult. The holidays can be an especially difficult time for people who spend them alone.

A few weeks ago, we talked about the emotional experience of loneliness.


Wikimedia Commons

E-cigarettes hit the market not too long ago as an aid to quit smoking. The CDC reported in 2015 that more than 9 million American adults vape regularly. Juuls are the new trendy e-cigarette that have become very popular among teens. It's an USB size e-cigarette that uses "pods" for the source of nicotine. College and high school campuses are having issues with the amount of teenagers who are taking on this new nicotine fad.

 

 


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Pollution and global warming rank near the top of environmentalists' growing list of concerns. But according to the Environmental Protection Agency, another menace to the environment is in many people's own backyards.

At least one person has died and more than 100 people have fallen ill from E. coli following a recent outbreak in connection with romaine lettuce from Arizona. Dr. Patricia Griffin, chief of the enteric diseases epidemiology branch at the CDC, explained how the recent outbreak happened and what consumers should be aware of when buying produce.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) are using DNA technology to try and prevent future E. coli outbreaks.

 

The method is called genome sequencing and it could eliminate the guessing game when it comes to finding the source of E. coli outbreaks. With it, scientists can determine the exact food and location in which the contaminated produce originated.

Liz West / Flickr

At least one person has died and more than 100 people have fallen ill from E. coli following a recent outbreak in connection with romaine lettuce from Arizona.

 

"Do not eat or buy romaine lettuce unless you can confirm it is not from the Yuma, Arizona growing region," says a statement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "This includes any pre-packaged salads or salad mixes.”

 

Dr. Patricia Griffin, chief of the enteric diseases epidemiology branch at the CDC, explains how the recent outbreak happened and what consumers should be aware of when buying produce.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

Atlanta is the fifth highest metro area for rates of new HIV diagnoses, but recent data shows annual infection rates in the state are dropping, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

WIKIPEDIA

A Consumer Reports study found three metro Atlanta teaching hospitals ranked among the lowest scores for preventing central-line infections in the ICU. These infections stem from improper use of IV tubes that supply medicine and other fluids to ailing patients. 

Atlanta Medical Center, Emory University Hospital Midtown and Grady Memorial Hospital ranked among the 31 lowest scoring hospitals nationwide that were covered in the report.

CDC Study: Georgia Ranks High For Certain STDs

Oct 25, 2016
Center for Diseases Control

In 2015, Georgia ranked sixth in the nation for the most reported chlamydia cases and seventh in reported gonorrhea cases according to the CDC Report of 2015 STD Statistics, released last week.