psychology

Konstantin Lazorkin / Creative Commons

People struggling with treatment-resistant PTSD may soon have a new course of care: MDMA. When used alongside psychotherapy, the synthetic substance in the drug more commonly known as ecstasy or molly is currently in phase three clinical trials. It’s even been given “breakthrough designation” by the FDA, a status reserved for treatments with significant potential to improve patient outcomes.

But MDMA isn’t the only kind of party drug experiencing interest for therapeutic potential. Psilocybin, the active ingredient in "magic mushrooms", is being evaluated for its potential in alleviating depression. Guided ayahuasca trips are a growing trend, especially amongst Brooklyn and Silicon Valley elites.


Meet scream researcher Harold Gouzoules, an Emory psychologist, and hear how goats yell, frogs screech and humans use screams as nonverbal forms of critical communication. 


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Many studies have shown how childhood experiences can have profound effects on physical and mental health later in life. Now, a new study from Georgia State University, is showing how racism affects children over time.

Dr. Sierra Carter is assistant professor of psychology at GSU and co-author of a study finding that African American children who experience early life stress from racial discrimination are at elevated risk for accelerated aging and depression later in life.


News continues to swirl around the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. On Second Thought takes a look at the constitutional foundations of impeachment with Buckner F. Melton Jr., professor of history and political science at Middle Georgia State University and author of The First Impeachment


Edvard Munch [Public domain] via Wikimedia Commons

Research from Emory University’s psychology department reveals the hidden intricacies of screams.

These primal vocalizations are found across various mammal species, not just humans. Rabbits, goats and even some amphibians such as frogs have been known to let out a scream in the name of self-defense.

The face of local news in Macon, Georgia, is changing. After nearly four decades, Friday is Oby Brown's last day at The Telegraph in Macon. Brown's departure comes amid what another outgoing editor called a "transformation" of the newspaper. Brown joined us in the studio to discuss the way local news is changing and reflect on his longtime career covering the news in middle Georgia. 

Last month, investigators in Atlanta recovered about 500 pounds of methamphetamine hidden inside Disney figurines. That's worth about $2 million. Drug Enforcement Administration officials not only say that Atlanta is a hub for crystal meth distribution; according to the DEA, meth also the "No. 1 threat" in the metro area.

Courtesy of Zack Robinson

Some people say that the longer you're married, the more you and your spouse resemble one another physically. But how about personalities?

 

A team of psychologists at the University of Georgia studied 169 heterosexual newlywed couples over the course of 18 months to see how quickly their personalities would change. The researchers followed the "Big 5" factor model, which tracks certain personality traits to understand and predict relationships.

Atlanta History Center

Former Spelman College President Beverly Daniel Tatum  is on a long quest to understand of psychology of racism. In 1997, she wrote a book about called ”Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria: And Other Conversations About Race.” Twenty years later, Tatum has updated the book. We talk with her ahead of an appearance Tuesday night, September 26, at the Atlanta History Center.

Jae C. Hong / The Associated Press

It’s been a year and a half since a deadly mass shooting in San Bernardino, California. The two attackers were killed after they gunned down 14 people. Georgia native Shannon Johnson, a graduate of Macon’s Windsor Academy, was one of them.

Roman Kruglov / Flickr

There’s a social theory in which individuals make choices to benefit the self, but ultimately harm themselves and the greater community. A new study published by researchers at Georgia Tech provides methods to combat what’s known as “tragedy of the commons.”

We speak with lead researcher and Georgia Tech Professor Joshua Weitz to talk about the implications of his counter-theory. Georgia State University sociology professor Dan Pasciuti also joins us to put the theory into a societal context. 

Break It Down: Cognitive Dissonance

Oct 25, 2016
Stuart Mudie / Flickr

Sometimes people won’t – or don’t – change their minds, even when they’re presented with evidence showing their views aren’t based in fact. One reason why is a psychological term called cognitive dissonance.  

You may hear more and more about cognitive dissonance as we get closer to the election. It's a term used to explain politics all the time. But it's something that not a lot of people really understand.