Politics

Grant Blankenship / GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp hopes to give public school teachers in Georgia a raise. The Republican candidate for governor says he will give teachers a permanent $5,000 annual pay raise, a plan that would cost taxpayers around $600 million a year.


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, after running three years behind and several billion dollars over budget, partners in Georgia Powers Plant Vogtle Nuclear Plant vote to continue funding the expansion project. Critics have fought against Vogtle's expansion, citing cost and safety concerns. We discuss whether or not the future of the project is in danger. 


Elise Amendola / The Associated Press

Pressure is ratcheting up on U.S. Sen. Susan Collins (R-Maine). She’s considered a swing vote in the confirmation of federal judge Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court. Collins’ office has been deluged with calls, threats, and a crowdsourcing campaign to unseat her if she votes for Kavanaugh has raised more than a million dollars. On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott talks with Sen. Collins at the ‘Constitutionally Speaking’ series event at  Saint Anselm College.


The deadline to register to vote in Georgia is Tuesday, Oct. 9.
Joel McLendon / flickr

The midterm elections are 42 days away and Tuesday, National Voter Registration Day, serves as a timely reminder to submit your registration information to be eligible to participate in the November contest. 

If you haven't registered to vote yet, you still have two weeks before the Tuesday, October 9 deadline. 

Brett Kavanaugh appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee for the third day of his confirmation hearing, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite, File / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, as Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court faces a make or break week, Sen. David Perdue (R-Georgia) urges his colleagues to take its time in vetting the allegations of sexual assault.


Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh meets Sen. David Perdue on Capitol Hill in Washington.
Manuel Balce Ceneta / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, evangelical leaders and GOP politicians are continuing to voice their support for Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh even as the controversy over allegations of sexual assault continue to cloud his confirmation.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, both Brian Kemp and Stacey Abrams are focusing on education and school safety this week on the campaign trail. We’ll discuss the nuanced differences between each candidate’s proposals and how they plan to fund their efforts.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Former President Jimmy Carter threw his support behind democratic gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams and her vision for rural healthcare in his hometown of Plains Tuesday.

Carter and his wife Rosalynn joined Abrams in front of the brand new Mercer University run health clinic across from the rail depot in Plains.


A new voting machine which prints a paper record sits on display at a polling site in Conyers, Ga.
David Goldman / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Federal Judge Amy Totenberg denied a group’s request to require the state to switch to paper ballots. Georgia’s 27,000 electronic voting machines will remain in use for November’s election. But she said that Georgia's election officials have "buried their heads in the sand" on the issue of voting vulnerabilities.


Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appeals court judge, appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing.
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Senate Judiciary Committee might have to delay their vote on Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh after sexual assault allegations have surfaced.


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As we near this year’s November election, there’s one recurring question: Will Georgia become a blue state? Before we look at the political future of the state, we did some research on the past.

Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
(AP Photo/Stephen B. Morton/John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp thinks there is a gang problem in Georgia and has laid out his plans for a new group to battle the issue. The Republican candidate for governor has come under scrutiny for figures he used to highlight the problem.


Voter casting his ballot in Sandy Springs, Ga.
John Bazemore, File / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia’s voting infrastructure and security is the focus of a lawsuit being argued in federal court. With the election less than two months away, election officials say a last-minute change to paper ballots would cause chaos, while voter security advocates hope United States District Court Judge Amy Totenberg will require the state to replace the touchscreen machines with paper ballots.  


From left: incumbent U.S. Rep. Karen Handel, candidate for lieutenant governor, Sarah Riggs Amico, candidate for governor Stacey Abrams.
(AP Photo/John Bazemore, GPB News/Stephen Fowler)

On this edition of Political Rewind, there are an unprecedented number of women running for office this year, and a majority of Americans are happy to see the increase.


Georgia gubernatorial candidates Stacey Abrams, left, and Brian Kemp.
JOHN AMIS, FILE) / AP PHOTOS

On this edition of Political Rewind, a new poll shows the race between Brian Kemp and Stacey Abrams is a virtual tie. The numbers also show how Georgian’s feel about President Donald Trump’s job performance.


David Goldman / AP Photo/File

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brian Kemp’s campaign will soon get another boost from the Trump Administration when Vice President Mike Pence visits Atlanta next week for a campaign rally. The White House endorsement made a big difference in the Republican primary, but will it have a similar impact for the general election?


Brett Kavanaugh, a federal appeals court judge, appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington during his Supreme Court confirmation hearing.
Andrew Harnik / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Brett Kavanaugh appears before the Senate Judiciary Committee this week in hopes of becoming the next justice to sit on the United States Supreme Court. Chaos and pandemonium marked the start of Kavanaugh’s hearing as democratic senators on the Judiciary Committee moved to delay the hearings.


Beth Macy

On this edition of Political Rewind, for six years, Roanoke-based journalist Beth Macy watched the opioid crisis unfold in struggling Appalachian communities all around her. And so she began documenting the roles that a pharmaceutical industry hungry for profit, medical practitioners intent on easing pain and government agencies slow to recognize the crisis all played in allowing a devastating plague of addiction to grip the entire region.


Brian Kemp speaks during a campaign event outlining policy intiatives for veterans in Georgia.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, with just over two months until voters decide this year’s election campaigns on both sides of the aisle are busy.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Things got heated in the race for Georgia's lieutenant governor Wednesday morning when Republican candidate Geoff Duncan and Democratic candidate Sarah Riggs Amico traded barbs.

In an interview with the Atlanta-Journal Constitution, Duncan campaign spokesperson Dan McLagan attacked Amico, a Marietta businesswoman, for attending a fundraiser in Beverly Hills, California, last week.

U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga.
(AP file/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, in a powerful rebuke on the Senate floor, Georgia’s Johnny Isakson takes aim at anyone who might treat the memory of John McCain with disrespect. Although President Donald Trump was not mentioned by name, the intention seemed clear.


The American flag flies at half-staff above the White House in honor of Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., Sunday, Aug. 26, 2018, in Washington. McCain, 81, died Saturday at his ranch in Arizona after a yearlong battle with brain cancer.
(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the country mourns the loss of Sen. John McCain, a proposal by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer to rename the Russell Senate Office Building in Washington to honor McCain is raising thorny questions with Georgians about the legacy of Richard Russell. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, a guilty plea in New York, a conviction in Virginia and a sentencing in Augusta. How will Georgia representatives and candidates for Governor react to the news? 


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

After drawing the attention of the whole country, election officials in Randolph County decided Friday morning not to close polling places. The decision took about 45 seconds.

One day after the group Georgians for the Impeachment of Donald Trump paid to have a billboard put up along St. Augustine Road in Valdosta, the Impeach Trump sign was taken down, according to the group's Facebook page
(Thomas Hochschild/Facebook)

On this edition of Political Rewind, two political controversies have plagued South Georgia.

The anger over a proposal to close most of the polling places in Randolph County is making national headlines and sparking continued allegations of voter suppression. Meanwhile, in Valdosta, a billboard advertising an 'Impeach Trump’ website survives just 24 hours before community pressure forces it down.


GPB News

How do you build an economy? From the top down or the ground up?

The major party candidates to be Georgia’s next governor offered their answers those questions at the annual Georgia Chamber of Commerce Luncheon in Macon Tuesday.

In her speech before the Chamber, Democrat Stacey Abrams floated ideas like a $10 million state fund for small business investment, money to be spent on wraparound services in public schools and Medicaid expansion as ideas for building economic capacity from the ground up. She called Medicaid expansion a bipartisan issue.

A worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta.
(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, we take a broad look at healthcare in Georgia. After multiple attempts, Congress has failed to shut down The Affordable Care Act, but President Donald Trump is eliminating a number of key provisions through executive orders. What’s the likely impact on Georgians of ending the individual mandate?


GPB Radio’s popular weekly program "Political Rewind" is expanding to television beginning Sept. 9. Each week on Sundays at 9 a.m., viewers of GPB’s statewide television network will now be able to see host Bill Nigut and the show’s rotating group of panelists, which includes some the most informed political insiders in the Southeast.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s a question a lot of Georgians have been asking this election season: given that the secretary of state oversees elections in the state, why doesn’t Brian Kemp have to step down from that position as he seeks to become governor?

 

Cathy Cox is well suited to answer that question. Today Cox is the dean of Walter F. George School of Law At Mercer University in Macon. She’s also run for governor as a Democrat while serving as Georgia’s secretary of state.


A voter enters a polling site in Atlanta, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017.
(AP PHOTO/DAVID GOLDMAN)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Secretary of State’s office claims there will be chaos at Georgia voting locations if a federal judge orders the state to switch to paper ballots. We look at the arguments from both sides of the aisle concerning the security of Georgia’s voting machines ahead of the November 6 election.


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