Politics

Brian Kemp speaks during a campaign event outlining policy intiatives for veterans in Georgia.
Stephen Fowler / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, with just over two months until voters decide this year’s election campaigns on both sides of the aisle are busy.


Stephen Fowler / GPB News

Things got heated in the race for Georgia's lieutenant governor Wednesday morning when Republican candidate Geoff Duncan and Democratic candidate Sarah Riggs Amico traded barbs.

In an interview with the Atlanta-Journal Constitution, Duncan campaign spokesperson Dan McLagan attacked Amico, a Marietta businesswoman, for attending a fundraiser in Beverly Hills, California, last week.

U.S. Sen. Johnny Isakson, R-Ga.
(AP file/Alex Brandon)

On this edition of Political Rewind, in a powerful rebuke on the Senate floor, Georgia’s Johnny Isakson takes aim at anyone who might treat the memory of John McCain with disrespect. Although President Donald Trump was not mentioned by name, the intention seemed clear.


The American flag flies at half-staff above the White House in honor of Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., Sunday, Aug. 26, 2018, in Washington. McCain, 81, died Saturday at his ranch in Arizona after a yearlong battle with brain cancer.
(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

On this edition of Political Rewind, as the country mourns the loss of Sen. John McCain, a proposal by Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer to rename the Russell Senate Office Building in Washington to honor McCain is raising thorny questions with Georgians about the legacy of Richard Russell. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

On this edition of Political Rewind, a guilty plea in New York, a conviction in Virginia and a sentencing in Augusta. How will Georgia representatives and candidates for Governor react to the news? 


Grant Blankenship / GPB News

After drawing the attention of the whole country, election officials in Randolph County decided Friday morning not to close polling places. The decision took about 45 seconds.

One day after the group Georgians for the Impeachment of Donald Trump paid to have a billboard put up along St. Augustine Road in Valdosta, the Impeach Trump sign was taken down, according to the group's Facebook page
(Thomas Hochschild/Facebook)

On this edition of Political Rewind, two political controversies have plagued South Georgia.

The anger over a proposal to close most of the polling places in Randolph County is making national headlines and sparking continued allegations of voter suppression. Meanwhile, in Valdosta, a billboard advertising an 'Impeach Trump’ website survives just 24 hours before community pressure forces it down.


GPB News

How do you build an economy? From the top down or the ground up?

The major party candidates to be Georgia’s next governor offered their answers those questions at the annual Georgia Chamber of Commerce Luncheon in Macon Tuesday.

In her speech before the Chamber, Democrat Stacey Abrams floated ideas like a $10 million state fund for small business investment, money to be spent on wraparound services in public schools and Medicaid expansion as ideas for building economic capacity from the ground up. She called Medicaid expansion a bipartisan issue.

A worker is seen behind the registration window of the emergency room at Grady Memorial Hospital in Atlanta.
(AP Photo/David Goldman)

On this edition of Political Rewind, we take a broad look at healthcare in Georgia. After multiple attempts, Congress has failed to shut down The Affordable Care Act, but President Donald Trump is eliminating a number of key provisions through executive orders. What’s the likely impact on Georgians of ending the individual mandate?


GPB Radio’s popular weekly program "Political Rewind" is expanding to television beginning Sept. 9. Each week on Sundays at 9 a.m., viewers of GPB’s statewide television network will now be able to see host Bill Nigut and the show’s rotating group of panelists, which includes some the most informed political insiders in the Southeast.

GOP candidate for governor Brian Kemp.
Grant Blankenship / GPB

There’s a question a lot of Georgians have been asking this election season: given that the secretary of state oversees elections in the state, why doesn’t Brian Kemp have to step down from that position as he seeks to become governor?

 

Cathy Cox is well suited to answer that question. Today Cox is the dean of Walter F. George School of Law At Mercer University in Macon. She’s also run for governor as a Democrat while serving as Georgia’s secretary of state.


A voter enters a polling site in Atlanta, Tuesday, Nov. 7, 2017.
(AP PHOTO/DAVID GOLDMAN)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the Secretary of State’s office claims there will be chaos at Georgia voting locations if a federal judge orders the state to switch to paper ballots. We look at the arguments from both sides of the aisle concerning the security of Georgia’s voting machines ahead of the November 6 election.


Georgia gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp on stage during a primary election night party in Athens, Ga.
(AP Photo/John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the ballot in Georgia’s 2018 midterm election is divided along money lines. Multimillionaires and candidates of more modest financial means are running in high-profile races. After reviewing financial disclosure statements from several candidates, our panel discusses whether personal wealth will be a blessing or a curse in this year’s contest.


On Tuesday, Aug. 14, 2018, Former President Jimmy Carter, 93, announced he is backing Democrat Stacey Abrams in the race for Georgia governor, becoming the third U.S. president to weigh in.
(AP Photo/John Amis)

On this edition of Political Rewind, it comes as no surprise that former President Jimmy Carter has now endorsed Democrat Stacey Abrams for Governor.


President Donald Trump and Governor Nathan Deal during a meeting with state leaders about prison reform, Thursday, Aug. 9, 2018, at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J.
(AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

On this edition of Political Rewind, both Brian Kemp and Stacey Abrams have shared their vision for improving education in Georgia. We take a closer look at the policies each candidate has proposed. Plus, the panel discusses what voters should make of Abrams’ personal finances and we take a closer look at the latest campaign ads.


Political Rewind: Cracking Open a Russian Troll Farm

Aug 10, 2018
Russian President Vladimir Putin looks over towards U.S. President Donald Trump as Trump speaks during their joint news conference at the Presidential Palace in Helsinki, Finland.
(AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

On this edition of "Political Rewind," we’ve heard a lot about Russian tampering with our elections but what visible evidence has been seen that it’s happening? We talk to a Clemson University researcher who says the proof is closer than you think, after discovering 3 million tweets created by a Russian troll farm.


Stephen Fowler | GPB News

As students across Georgia are making plans to head back into the classrooms, Democratic nominee for Governor Stacey Abrams released her own plan for Georgia’s education system.

At a press conference, the former Georgia House Minority Leader said fully funding the Quality Basic Education formula for schools is an important first step in serving Georgia’s students, but it’s not enough.

Georgia State Capitol
GPB

On this edition of Political Rewind, a special election for Ohio’s 12th Congressional District was “too close to call” on Tuesday night. Vying for a congressional seat that has been held by a Republican for three decades, Trump-backed Republican Troy Balderson and Democrat Danny O'Connor have put GOP congressional campaigns across the country on alert. 


President Trump shakes hands with Ohio 12th District Republican nominee Troy Balderson during a rally last weekend in Lewis Center, Ohio.
(AP Photo/John Minchillo)

On this edition of Political Rewind, the panel takes a look at a new attack ad against Stacey Abrams calling her a "Bloomberg-Soros Hate America Leftist." Meanwhile, Abrams uses an appearance on national television to attack Brian Kemp on his job performance as Georgia's Secretary of State. 


Cindy Hill

Democratic candidate for governor Stacey Abrams kicked off a statewide tour Thursday in Coastal Georgia. She started the tour at an ironworkers apprentice workshop in Pooler, where she announced a plan to create 22,000 apprenticeships in Georgia by 2022.

Abrams also announced initiatives to help small businesses, military veterans and young people who are entering the workforce.  She said she wants rural communities to attract new jobs throughout the state.


Grant Blankenship / GPB

The Macon-Bibb County Commission amended their just passed budget to restore funding to local libraries and other public services Tuesday night. 

The first budget that passed last week just under the wire of the new fiscal year had zeroed out library funding, money for public transit as well as for the local health department,  museums and other "external" services. A hue and cry ensued. 


Your Best Digs / www.yourbestdigs.com/reviews/best-toaster/

What makes a Millennial? A recent Pew Research Center study says it's anyone born from 1982-2000. But "Millennial" also means viewing climate change and conflict as the most critical issues, according to the most recent World Economic Forum Global Shapers Survey.


 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

You probably saw the photo. 

A woman with her right hand raised in a fist, her left on the autobiography of Malcolm X. That was Mariah Parker. 


WHENISCALENDARS.COM/GOOGLE IMAGES

Primary election day is May 22 and all of the state's top elected officials are on the ballot. There will be a new governor, lieutenant governor and secretary of state. Every U.S. House seat is up as well.  GPB’s Stephen Fowler has been following these races. He joined Rickey Bevington in the studio to talk about some of the challenges these offices will face, regardless of the election's outcome. 

Less than a week before the Republican gubernatorial primary, one topic reigned supreme in the Atlanta Press Club Loudermilk-Young debate: immigration, and how to stop unauthorized people from entering the country.

Monique Bandong / NextGenRadio

Ian Garvey didn’t know very many Donald Trump supporters before he met Tim Huff. Huff had never met a transgender person. Two weeks before Trump became president, Garvey was randomly placed in Huff’s dorm room.

Garvey moved in January 2017. At the time, the election had a heavy effect on the campus’ political climate, sparking protests and heated discussions. Oglethorpe University President Larry Schall sent a campus-wide email that invited students to a conversation at the dining hall.

Emily Cureton / GPB News

Georgia Democrats are hoping 2018 is the year Gwinnett County finally turns blue.  Five Republican lawmakers are either retiring or running for other offices. Democrats are working hard to mobilize voters ahead of the May 22 primary and keep them energized into November.

Paul Sherman

A lot of people collect things, and in Paul Sherman’s family, that thing is campaign memorabilia. Paul’s new book is called “Look Away: Documenting Crude and Sexist Items From the Trump Campaign Trail.” It includes several pictures from rallies in Georgia. We recently caught up with three members of the Sherman family.

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

For generations, Atlanta has been known unofficially as the black capital of America. In 1971, Ebony magazine called Atlanta the "black mecca of the South." We talked with Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson, who challenges that notion in his new book.

Paul Sherman

A lot of people collect things, and in Paul Sherman’s family, that thing is campaign memorabilia. Paul’s new book is called “Look Away: Documenting Crude and Sexist Items From the Trump Campaign Trail.” It includes several pictures from rallies in Georgia. We recently caught up with three members of the Sherman family.

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