Political Rewind

Grant Blankenship / GPB News

A couple days after Hurricane Michael struck, Georgia farmer Phillip Buckhalter went out to survey what remained of a neighbor’s cotton field in Early County near Jakin.

The morning before the major hurricane, Phillip and his son had helped picked as much cotton as they could for their neighbor in order to save as much of the crop as possible. As Buckhalter approached the fields in southwest Georgia, he saw the damage to the crop was severe.

John Bazemore / The Associated Press

Security questions continue to swirl around Georgia’s electoral process. Lawmakers largely agree the state’s current touch-screen voting machines have to go. They don’t leave a paper trail, and some analysts worry they could be hacked. The question isn’t whether the machines need to be replaced – but how.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

Georgia’s gubernatorial race, overshadowed by accusations of unfairness from both sides, is over.  On Nov. 17, officials certified the results and declared Republican Brian Kemp governor-elect. 

Democrat Stacey Abrams is not challenging that outcome, but, in a fiery speech, she slammed the electoral process that produced it.  “Political Rewind” host Bill Nigut stops by “On Second Thought” to offer analysis.

Wikimedia Commons

Is Georgia turning blue? That question came up in 2014 when Jason Carter ran for governor, in 2016 when Hillary Clinton ran for president and in 2017 with Jon Ossoff’s campaign in the most expensive House race in history. Every time, however, Georgia remained a red state where Republicans won.


WSB-TV Atlanta

Republican candidates for governor Secretary of State Brian Kemp and Lt. Gov. Casey Cagle squared off in a debate Sunday, hosted in Atlanta by WSB-TV.

Earlier Sunday morning, GPB hosted a debate on Political Rewind with Bill Nigut.

Kemp attacked Cagle over a secret recording, in which Cagle said he pushed a bill he considered "bad public policy" to undermine a primary opponent. 

Today: Georgia's U.S. Senators go their separate ways over President Trump's tariffs. Johnny Isakson wants Congress to approve them while David Perdue says the President has the power to act on his own. We'll look at that split, and at Perdue's apparent unwavering loyalty to the Trump agenda. 


Olivia Re / Ms.

On this Special Edition of Political Rewind, we are live at the State Capitol as legislators work furiously to finish their business before the 2018 session comes to an end.  We look at the fate of key legislation: what’s happening with bills on distracted riving, protecting religious groups that don’t want to adopt children to gays and lesbians, giving additional help to victims of childhood sexual abuse and cracking down on undocumented immigrants?  Plus, we’ll explain the sneaky tactics that come into play on this last day as legislators try to work their will on measures they want to pa

Are some of the Republican Party’s top stars beginning to pave the way to run for president in 2020 if Donald Trump steps aside? On today’s show we’ll talk about a New York Times report that Vice President Mike Pence, Ohio Governor John Kasich, and senators Tom Cotton and Ben Sasse are beginning to make the kind of moves that could position them to be ready for a run.  The story has infuriated the Vice President, who says it’s not true. But is it? Our panel weighs in.

Breaking Down The March 15 Primaries

Mar 16, 2016
Tony Dejak / AP

In news from Washington, President Obama picked the top judge from the DC Circuit to be the next Supreme Court justice. Merrick Garland is a former federal prosecutor who had been previously been recommended to the president by a leading Republican for openings on the Court. 

Lynne Sladky / AP

Another round of Tuesday primary voting has come and gone, and with it another round of opportunities for those trailing Republican front-runner Donald Trump to make a dent in his ever growing delegate lead.