photography

Halloween week might be a time for imaging run-down, decrepit buildings, but they don’t scare photographer Jeff Hagerman. Having ventured inside these abandonded beauties with a camera, a flashlight and some gloves – Herman's resulting images now comprise his second book. Find out what he sees behind the closed doors you may pass on your daily commute.

News continues to swirl around the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump. On Second Thought takes a look at the constitutional foundations of impeachment with Buckner F. Melton Jr., professor of history and political science at Middle Georgia State University and author of The First Impeachment


Courtesy of the High Museum of Art

"There is no exquisite beauty...without some strangeness in the proportion."

That's a line from Edgar Allan Poe, the king of the dark and eerie, the strange and surreal. It could also describe the appeal of an exhibition currently on view at the High Museum of Art, called "Strange Light: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin."


Antonio Johnson

The theory known as "The Third Space" claims that, for more open and creative interaction in communities, you need neutral places outside of work and home like churches, cafes and parks.

In many traditionally black neighborhoods, that third space is the barber shop. Photographer Antonio Johnson has been documenting these anchors of community across the country in his project, You Next.


Mary Beth Meehan

If art is supposed to start conversations, then “Seeing Newnan” is working. The project mounted 19 large-scale photographs of residents on buildings around Newnan, Georgia.

Artist Mary Beth Meehan’s large-scale photographs of residents in Newnan have exposed the shifting demographics of the town. A resident, who protested the image of two Muslim schoolgirls in the town square, got more than a thousand responses from others who embrace a more inclusive vision of the town.


Courtesy of the High Museum of Art

"There is no exquisite beauty...without some strangeness in the proportion."

That's a line from Edgar Allan Poe, the king of the dark and eerie, the strange and surreal. It could also describe the appeal of an exhibition currently on view at the High Museum of Art, called "Strange Light: The Photography of Clarence John Laughlin."

Laughlin has been called "Edgar Allan Poe with a camera." He was a Louisiana native and Southern photographer known as the "Father of American Surrealism." A fascinating and irascible character, Laughlin broke boundaries with photographic innovations that linked imagery to the subconscious. 


Courtesy Peyton Fulford / Getty Images

Stock photos are often the butt of jokes for being unrealistic, generic, overused and, now, perpetuating stereotypes. A new campaign from Getty Images, Dove Beauty and GirlGaze is working to change that.

Together, they've launched #ShowUs, the largest stock photo collection created by women. Their goal? To subvert beauty stereotypes.


Golden Globe nominations have been announced, and several Georgia-based productions are in the running. The list came as a "Boycott Georgia" hashtag is being used by some film industry insiders. Some are protesting the victory of Brian Kemp, while others say they're concerned about the religious freedom bill the governor-elect expressed support for on the campaign trail. Opponents say the proposed legislation would discriminate against the LGBTQ community. 

GPB's "The Credits" podcast host Kalena Boller spoke to "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott about the controversial issue. 

 


Joe H. Shipp

The Bitter Southerner recently published its first hardcover book. "A Community in Black & White: A Most Unusual Photo Album of One Southern Community" is a collection of photographs Joe Hardy Shipp took of Hickman County, Tennessee, over several decades in the mid-twentieth century.

 

His grandson, Joseph Shipp, discovered the collection, which includes thousands of black and white photographs of both black and white members of the Hickman County community. The unusual part? These photos were taken at the height of Jim Crow when white-owned businesses only served white customers. 


Sean Powers / Georgia Public Broadcasting

Curtis Bonds Baker is like a fly on the wall in Georgia's film and television industry. He is a still photographer, who takes photos of the cast and crew on set.

 

His credits include a number of TV shows, such as FX’s "Atlanta,” MTV’s "Scream,” and Netflix's "Stranger Things." He told host Kalena Boller that a big part of his job is trying to remain invisible.

On Second Thought For Monday, May 14, 2018

May 14, 2018

Several major productions are being filmed in Georgia right now.  AJC Buzz Blog writer Jennifer Brett joins us to talk about upcoming films “Boss Level,” “What Men Want,” and “Ant-Man and The Wasp.” We also discuss the television shows that are filming in Georgia, like “Stranger Things” and “The Walking Dead.”  

Courtesy Curtis Bonds Baker

The Netflix movie "Candy Jar," which premiered last month, was filmed in Georgia. It stars Christina Hendricks and Helen Hunt. Candy Jar follows two high school debate champions focused on getting into college.

 

One person who worked behind the scenes of "Candy Jar" is Curtis Bonds Baker of Atlanta.

Brian Brown

As metro Atlanta grows, the population of rural Georgia shrinks. Photographer Brian Brown is documenting the architecture of the country before it disappears. He started where he grew up, and created the website “Vanishing South Georgia.” Now he has sites devoted to North and Coastal Georgia, too. We talk with Brown about what there is to learn from decaying houses and shuttered storefronts.

Photo Courtesy of Karcheik Sims-Alvarado

There’s no doubt Atlanta played a big role in the civil rights movement. Now, that history is archived in a new photo book called “Atlanta and the Civil Rights Movement, 1944 -1968.” We talk with historian Karcheik Sims-Alvarado about the significance of these photographs.

Dr. Sims-Alvarado will appear at the Atlanta History Center Saturday, June 17 at 11 a.m.

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 

 

When Kathryn Mayo decided to pursue an art project in her hometown of Selma Alabama, she was afraid she might not speak the language anymore.

 

“One of the things that's happened since I've moved to California is that I've lost a lot of my accent,” Mayo said.

 

Jim Gathany / Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The museum at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention features a collection of photos by Jim Gathany. The exhibit is called “A Lens on CDC,” and it runs until the end of May. For 30 years, Gathany has documented the center’s scientific breakthroughs, its facilities, and its history. We talked with Gathany about his experience behind the lens at the CDC. 

Kate T. Parker

The role of a female photographer is especially important in an age when women are often depicted in superficial or sexualized ways. Many women in the photography industry are trying to change that, including Kate Parker, whose new book, “Strong is the New Pretty,” depicts girls as unique and capable, rather than simply primped and stereotypically pretty.

© Thomas Struth

Thomas Struth captures larger-than-life photographs that take people places they don't normally get to see – like space stations and physics laboratories. His images often focuses on technology and man-made landscapes and he encourages viewers to see the world differently.

Ayana Jackson

Visual artist Ayana Jackson fights photography with photography. She uses her lens to explore how images captured by white photographers shape and construct African and African-American identities. In her latest collection, she assumes the role of historic black women from the 19th century, including her own relatives. 

We speak with Jackson about her work, how Africans and African-Americans are represented through images, and why the race of the person behind the lens matters.

Courtesy of Harry Benson

Photographer Harry Benson got his big break when he was assigned to travel with an aspiring band on their first American tour in 1964. That band was The Beatles. He produced one of the most iconic photos of the Fab Four, which shows the group enjoying a pillow fight in their Paris hotel room. 

Grant Blankenship / GPB

 Jim Alexander has done a lot of things.

 

At one time or another he has been a bookstore owner, the general manager of a newspaper delivery service and a car detailer. He ran a pool room, taught horseback riding and was a diesel engine mechanic in the Navy.

“So in my life I’ve done things,” he said

But what really defines Alexander are his camera and his activism.