peanuts

Kimberly Vardeman / Wikimedia Commons

From the devastation of Hurricane Michael to trade tariffs, Georgia farmers have faced months of uncertainty. After stalled disaster and tariff aid packages, American farmers are still struggling while being shuffled around the political gameboard. 

 

Mark Peele is a cotton grower and president of the South Central Georgia Gin Company. He joined On Second Thought on the line from Berrien County to talk about the outlook — and mindset — of Georgia farmers. Jeffrey Harvey, director of the Georgia Farm Bureau's Public Policy Department, also joined the conversation from GPB's studio in Macon.

 

 

Courtesy of Chef Nolan Wynn

"On Second Thought" continues its Main Ingredient series in which a chef tells us about his or her essential Southern ingredient. 

For Chef Nolan Wynn, that ingredient is the peanut. He's the executive chef of Banshee in East Atlanta Village, which he co-founded with Faielle Stocco, Peter Chvala and Katie McDonald. "On Second Thought" host Virginia Prescott visited Wynn to learn how to make his savory peanut brittle.


Georgia Department of Agriculture

Hurricane Michael swept across south Georgia last week, devastating the state's pecan orchards, cotton plants, chicken coops and peanut crops. Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) administrator Brock Long said Monday the true cost of the devastation won't be clear for some time. Irwin County pecan grower Randy Hudson and Berrien County cotton grower Mark Peele told "On Second Thought" they expect it could take generations for Georgia farmers to recoup their losses — if ever.

"You can't walk away, but then I'm sitting here with such a dead load," said Hudson, a fifth-generation pecan farmer. "How do I repay this now? How do I start over?"


Georgia Pecan Commission

It could take years for some of Georgia's pecan crops to recover after Hurricane Michael tore through the southwest part of the state on Wednesday.  

Tim Brown is with Apollo Pecan Nursery and Groves in Preston, Ga., about halfway between Columbus and Albany. 

He says many of their trees are younger, which means they were more flexible in withstanding high winds and heavy rains. But other nurseries in the area weren't as lucky. 

UGA Researchers Map The Peanut Genome

Jan 31, 2018
Pollinator/Wikimedia Commons

Peanut lovers around the world can rejoice that an international group researchers led by the University of Georgia have found the beloved nut’s genome.

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