OutKast

Dee Dee Hibbler-Murray says her current job as entertainment consultant for the DeKalb County government is an "old music lady's dream come true."

Every job she's had — from selling music at Turtles Records and Tape, to managing an upstart band called OutKast, to running T.I.'s K.I.N.G. Foundation — has materialized in part by envisioning what she wants by showing up, making that phone call, sending that follow-up note and taking risks. 


Dee Dee Hibbler now consults for the Dekalb County film commission after being an instrumental figure in establishing Atlanta as the hip-hop capital of the south. Hibbler is also known as “Peaches” most commonly associated with Outkast and Dungeon Family fame. She joins On Second Thought to talk about her work with some of the most notable names in hip-hop. 


Credit: MARTA

MARTA is considering renaming five train stations in Atlanta. It's an effort to keep up with changes in the city and to reflect surrounding neighborhoods.

One station proposed to be re-christened: Bankhead. The area was named after the highway that ran through it, which was in turn named after an Alabama family. But the Bankhead name is perhaps more closely associated with the torrent of rap and hip hop that grew from Atlanta's Westside and nearby neighborhoods. So, what's in the name "Bankhead"?


Jaleesa Ledbetter is an Atlanta-based DJ and member of Werc Crew, a collective of artists, producers and DJs in the city. Under the name DJ Hourglass, she's opened for artists like Princess Nokia and played Atlanta festivals Afropunk and A3C.

 

She shared her favorite holiday songs to play at parties and the first time she met Janelle Monáe with "On Second Thought."

 


The Bitter Southerner

In New York in the 1980s, Chuck Reece had his first job in journalism covering the media industry for Adweek magazine. That meant he got the first look at network television pilots and magazine protoypes, and every time any of those had something to do with the South, he said he only saw a couple of stereotypes. 

"One looked like the party scene from the beginning of 'Gone with the Wind' except maybe with updated clothing, and the other one looked like ... 'The Beverly Hillbillies' to 'Duck Dynasty,' most recently," Reece said. "Those two stereotypes just didn't fit the South that I grew up in and knew."


What's In A Name? | College Park

Aug 27, 2018
Mary L. Martin Ltd.

In this "What's In A Name," we answer a question from a listener "Djam" who wrote on our website. 

Djam was curious about the origins of College Park's name.
 


Just when it seems Atlanta's done all it can to decimate rap's beloved traditions, someone hops out of bounds again, crosses another line, slaughters a sacred cow.

The Southern dialect is a complex thing, especially when pouring out the mouths of three of the regions best rappers ever. From the marble-mouthed flow of trapper du jour Gucci Mane, to the elongated vowel sounds of the dearly departed Pimp C, to the sticky, multi-syllabic delivery of OutKast's most consistent player Big Boi, it comes in all drawls and colors.

When the story of Atlanta's turn-of-the-millennium sonic boom is told 100 years from now, Organized Noize — the production trio of Ray Murray, Sleepy Brown and Rico Wade — will be the sound architects credited with putting the Dirty South on the map.

Culture Wars

Mar 15, 2017
Illustration: Stephen Fowler, GPB News

The Georgia Institute of Technology is known for graduating its students from nationally-ranked programs in science, technology, engineering and math.

A new class taught by visiting professor Dr. Joyce Wilson is using hip-hop to take those students down a more creative pathway than their STEM studies to learn about issues such as race, poverty and cultural identity.

The class is titled “Exploring the Lyrics of OutKast and Trap Music to Explore Politics of Social Justice.”

Dr. Wilson joined me in the studio to explain why she’s teaching trap at Tech.

The DePaulia / flickr

A class at Armstrong State University in Savannah teaches students about the music of OutKast. As part of our Lessons from Left Field series, we talk with professor Regina Bradley and two of her students: Anthony Scott and Gabby Nichols.

 

Georgia Playlist: Anthony Aparo

Jan 6, 2017
Jonathan Splitlog

Atlanta-based songwriter Anthony Aparo is best known as the front man for the band Culture Culture and a performer for the local collaboration ATL Collective. Anthony is featured in an upcoming GPB Music Session, and gave us two more tunes for our essential Georgia Playlist. Picks include songs by OutKast and Drivin’ n Cryin’. 

A3C: You Can Find Me In The A!

Oct 3, 2016
Jack Kennard / jackkennard.com

Atlanta rappers are never hesitant to shout out their neighborhoods and favorite spots around town. Write what you know, "rep where ya stay."

Wiki Commons

"Outkast and Goodie Mob are sincerely detailing what they hear the community discuss," said Georgia State University professor Maurice Hobson. He is the author of the forthcoming book, "The Legend of the Black Mecca: Myth, Maxim, and the Making of an Olympic City."

He shares how Outkast's single "Git Up, Git Out" from their debut album "Southernplayalisticadillacmuzik" offers a window into how Atlanta's African American community responded to the changes from the 1996 Summer Olympic Games. 

Diwang Valdez

Not long ago, “Two Way Street” producer Jenny Ament told me she thought we ought to do an interview with Dr. Dax. Dax, for all of you out there who are as clueless as I was, is one of the best-known Atlanta graffiti writers to make a splash on the national scene.

Street Clothes

Ahead of this week’s Stopover Music Festival in Savannah, we talk to one of the event’s featured artists for the Georgia Playlist. 

    

Andy Sutphen of the Savannah group Street Clothes tells us about two of his favorite songs by Georgia artists.