NRA

Stephen Fowler | GPB News

Two weeks after a pair of deadly mass shootings in Texas and Ohio left 31 dead, a longstanding fundraiser at a gun range outside of Atlanta drew criticism – and record crowds.

At the 11th District Republican Party’s fifth annual marksmanship and barbecue event, conversation centered on the feeling that responsible, law-abiding gun owners were getting a bad rap when it comes to talking about gun control.


Carolyn Meadows at the National Rifle Association's annual meeting of members in Indianapolis. Meadows was elected president of the NRA during a board meeting Monday, April 29, 2019.
Michael Conroy / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, Georgia Democrats ponder their next steps in the effort to unseat David Perdue now that Stacey Abrams announces she won’t make the race.


Brett Kavanaugh appearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee for the third day of his confirmation hearing, on Capitol Hill in Washington.
J. Scott Applewhite, File / AP Photo

On this edition of Political Rewind, as Brett Kavanaugh's confirmation to the Supreme Court faces a make or break week, Sen. David Perdue (R-Georgia) urges his colleagues to take its time in vetting the allegations of sexual assault.


(AP Photo/Richard Drew)

On this edition of Political Rewind, in a matchup between Delta Airlines and the NRA, it’s no contest: GOP legislators pass a tax break that saves Georgian millions, but denies Delta a cut worth $40 million.  We’ll look at the long-range consequences of the battle.  Plus, thousands of gun safety advocates rallied at the State Capitol last month, but their voices were silenced by an official who made sure the microphones at the state facility were turned off.  Also, a Columbus state senator pushes a bill to force the city of Atlanta to shorten the hours of city polling places, leading critic

(AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)

Georgia’s governor is temporarily giving up on a controversial tax break for Delta and other airlines that buy jet fuel in Georgia.

Governor Nathan Deal proposed a tax break that would save airlines about 50 million dollars each year as part of a larger overhaul of the state’s income taxes.

But on Wednesday, the Senate Rules Committee followed through on Lt. Governor Casey Cagle’s tweet about ‘killing’ the tax break and removed it from the bill.

On this edition of Political Rewind, we are live from the Georgia State Capitol for Crossover Day.  Which crucial bills will die and which will live to see another day?  Among the measures hanging in the balance: a bill to keep guns out of the hands of Georgians with mental illness and a tax break for Delta Airlines that’s now caught up in the highly charged gun control debate. 

Panelists:

AJC Lead Political Writer Jim Galloway

AJC Political Reporter Greg Bluestein

Columbus Mayor Teresa Tomlinson

Republican Insider Jackie Cushman

Shots Fired At Dalton High School

Did Cagle Break Law In Delta/NRA Spat?

Crossover Day At The State House

  • It Is Crossover Day At The State House
  • Branch Appointed To 11th U.S. Circuit Court Of Appeals
  • Delta Vs. NRA Update

(AP Photo/Chris O'Meara, File)

On this edition of Political Rewind, Delta Airlines cuts ties with the NRA and now finds itself in a showdown with legislators who want to punish the Atlanta-based company by denying it a long-sought tax break.  Also at the State Capitol, an outspoken GOP legislator is under fire for telling the widow of a man killed by a distracted driver that the vote she cast on a bill was done purely out of spite.  Plus, new revelations about Russian interference in the 2016 election and how Georgians were targeted with thousands of manipulative tweets.

Panelists:

The House approved a bill on Wednesday that would ease legal restrictions for carrying concealed firearms across state lines – a move pushed by the National Rifle Association that comes just weeks after mass shootings in Las Vegas and Texas.

On a mostly party-line vote, the measure easily passed, 231-198, although 14 Republicans voted no. Six Democrats voted for the so-called reciprocity measure, which would allow a gun owner with the proper permit in any state to carry a concealed firearm to another state where it is also legal.

Two weeks ago, bump stocks were just an odd-sounding firearm attachment largely unknown outside gun enthusiast circles.

That all changed early last week with the deadly shooting in Las Vegas, where police discovered a dozen of the devices in the shooter's hotel room overlooking the city's neon-lit Strip. Now, Republicans and Democrats in Congress, the National Rifle Association and other pro-gun groups are asking for a fresh look at the legality of bump stocks.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Updated at 3:20 p.m. ET

The National Rifle Association says it is open to new regulations on bump stocks, devices possessed by the mass shooter in Las Vegas that can be used to fire rifles similarly to automatic weapons. This comes as top Republicans in Congress appear open to the idea of a federal law banning the devices.

NAAGA

The number of  African Americans who own guns is on the rise.

 

According to a 2014 Pew survey, 19 percent of African Americans said they owned a gun, up from 15 percent in 2013.

 

 

 

The National African American Gun Association is a nationwide group based in Atlanta made up of black gun supporters. The organization has seen membership climb to 20,000 members in just two years.

AP / David Goldman

The National Rifle Association held its annual meeting in Atlanta over the weekend. President Donald Trump headlined the event with a speech. Senior producer Emily Cureton was in the crowd, and she brings us this audio postcard.

Updated at 4:50 p.m. ET.

President Trump spoke to the National Rifle Association's annual leadership forum on Friday, the first sitting president since Ronald Reagan to do so.

"We have news that you've been waiting for ... a long time," Trump told the crowd in Atlanta. "The eight-year assault on your Second Amendment freedoms has come to a crashing end."

Much of his speech echoed the rhetoric he used on the campaign, and has continued at rallies during his first 100 days in office.

By a 57-43 margin, the Republican-led Senate voted Wednesday to repeal an Obama-era regulation designed to block certain mentally ill people from purchasing firearms. The vote, which approves a House resolution passed earlier this month, now sends the measure to the White House for President Trump's signature.