New York Times

Rachael Joyce

Revisionist History podcast host Malcolm Gladwell's books have opened up new ways to consider human behavior — introducing concepts like "stickiness," the "10,000 hour rule" and The Tipping Point

His newest New York Times best-seller asks why we are so bad at understanding people we don't know. It's called Talking To Strangers. 


John Locher / Associated Press

President Donald Trump is headed to both Dayton, Ohio, and El Paso, Texas, Wednesday in response to the recent mass shootings in the two cities.

Along with the previous week's shooting in Gilroy, California, there were 34 people killed and dozens injured in a single week.

Rick Rojas is also in El Paso. He's the new national correspondent for the South at The New York Times. He joined On Second Thought to give us an update on the situation — and the sentiment — in the aftermath of the El Paso shooting.


Over his 19-year career with the Navy SEALs, Special Operations Chief Edward "Eddie" Gallagher earned high honors for valor and leadership as a medic, sniper and explosives expert. But less than a year after Gallagher returned from his eighth deployment – fighting the Islamic State in Mosul, Iraq – he drew a different kind of attention from the Navy: he was charged with war crimes, among them premeditated murder. Gallagher's case goes to trial in May. He and his family have denied all charges.

When New York Times national correspondent Dave Philipps began reporting on Gallagher's case, he thought he might learn that Gallagher had suffered some kind of psychotic break as the result of numerous combat deployments over the course of nearly two decades. But what Philipps has found, through interviews and hundreds of pages of internal military documents, defied expectations. Joining on the line from Colorado Springs, Colorado, Philipps told On Second Thought that Gallagher's case reveals a Navy SEAL culture "split between loyalty and justice." 

 


Over his 19-year career with the Navy SEALs, Special Operations Chief Edward "Eddie" Gallagher earned high honors for valor and leadership as a medic, sniper and explosives expert. But less than a year after Gallagher returned from his eighth deployment – fighting the Islamic State in Mosul, Iraq – he drew a different kind of attention from the Navy: he was charged with war crimes, among them premeditated murder. Gallagher's case goes to trial in May. He and his family have denied all charges.

When New York Times national correspondent Dave Philipps began reporting on Gallagher's case, he thought he might learn that Gallagher had suffered some kind of psychotic break as the result of numerous combat deployments over the course of nearly two decades. But what Philipps has found, through interviews and hundreds of pages of internal military documents, defied expectations. Joining on the line from Colorado Springs, Colorado, Philipps told On Second Thought that Gallagher's case reveals a Navy SEAL culture "split between loyalty and justice." 


Jae C. Hong / AP Images

Georgia is home to hundreds of thousands of military veterans. The state also boasts tens of thousands of active duty and reserve personnel. Sometimes, those numbers come with four letters: PTSD or Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder. 

On Second Thought continued a conversation with New York Times reporter David Philipps about his investigative research on Navy Seals and war crimes. Liza Zwiebach also joined the conversation with her clinical expertise. 


Courtesy AP Images

Suicide is the second leading cause of death among 15 to 29-year-olds in the United States. A 2018 study from the Centers For Disease Control and Prevention shows suicide rates increased by 16 percent in Georgia between 1996 and 2016.

 

Tech giant Facebook wants to help prevent suicide with artificial intelligence.

Courtesty of St. Martin's Press/Jonathan Weisman, Twitter

Growing up in Atlanta in the 1970s, Jonathan Weisman didn't think much about anti-Semitism. In fact, he didn't think much about being Jewish until 2016. That's when he, as deputy editor of the Washington Bureau of  "The New York Times," posted a quote from an op-ed about facism on Twitter. That tweet unleashed a torrent of anti-semitic images, threats and other forms of cyber-stalking that shattered his complacency.

Weisman used the tools of his profession to expose the trolls and the political, cultural and technological forces that have fueled an avalanche of attacks against Jews since 2016 - from online conspiracies to real-world violence, like the massacre of 11 people at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh in October.


Screenshot by GPB / nytimes.com

When fashion designer Kate Spade died last week of an apparent suicide, there was an outpouring of grief, from Twitter to the front page of the New York Times. "Buying a Kate Spade handbag was a coming-of-age ritual for a generation of American women," declared the Times.


Today on “Two Way Street” we’re discussing The New York Times obituary project “Overlooked” with its co-creator Jessica Bennett. From Ida B.