National Hurricane Center

National Hurricane Center

UPDATE 4:30 p.m.: Gov. Brian Kemp has declared a state of emergency for 12 Georgia counties — Brantley, Bryan, Camden, Charlton, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, McIntosh, Pierce and Wayne — as Hurricane Dorian approaches Florida’s coastline.

National Hurricane Center

UPDATE Thursday, 5:00 p.m.: Gov. Kemp declared a state of emergency in a dozen coastal Georgia counties ahead as Hurricane Dorian approaches the Southeast.

The affected counties are Brantley, Bryan, Camden, Charlton, Chatham, Effingham, Glynn, Liberty, Long, Pierce and Wayne.  Kemp says for now the major danger for southeast Georgia is the potential for flooding from Dorian which looks to become a massive but very slow moving storm. State laws preventing price gouging at the gas pump are also in effect.

UPDATE Thursday, 3:00 p.m: Gov. Brian Kemp reiterated that Dorian's path was still too uncertain to make big moves in emergency preparedness in Georgia. However, he did say that heavy rain and unusually high tides will make flooding in some parts of the state almost a certainty. Kemp advised preparing for flooding now.

UPDATE 6:18 p.m.: Governor Brian Kemp said in a briefing Wednesday evening that state officials are monitoring Hurricane Dorian closely and preparing for potential evacuations, although it was too soon to tell the exact track of the storm or predict its impact on Georgia.

NOAA

Forecasters now say we could be in for a more active hurricane season than they originally predicted. 

 

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says the El Niño weather pattern, which suppresses hurricane activity, has ended. That means it's more likely this hurricane season will be above normal.

 

Forecasters are now predicting 10 to 17 named storms this season. An average season has 12.

Astronaut Ricky Arnold, from aboard the International Space Station, shared this image of Hurricane Florence on Sept. 10, taken as the orbiting laboratory flew over the massive storm.
Ricky Arnold / NASA

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center monitor storm systems in the ocean long before they threaten land, and often identify tropical cyclones long before they become hurricanes.

Storms like this only get names once they reach the level of a tropical storm, which have sustained wind speeds of 39 to 73 mph.

National Hurricane Center

A tropical depression is likely to form in the Gulf of Mexico and has the potential to produce heavy rainfall by the end of the week, according to the National Hurricane Center.

A trough of low pressure over central Georgia is forecast to move southward toward the northeastern Gulf, where a broad area of low pressure will form in a couple of days, forecasters said Monday.

The system has the potential to bring heavy rain along the northern and eastern U.S. Gulf.