National Center for Civil and Human Rights

25 years ago, in April of 1994, the country of Rwanda was embroiled in a genocide.

Led by the Hutu majority government, an estimated 800,000 members of the Tutsi ethnic group were murdered.

 


GPB/ Jade Abdul-Malik

Museums that hold the history of our collective past are having a renewed moment right now.  

 

As the country and the world grapples with a rise in white supremacy, xenophobia, racist rhetoric, and mass killing, people are flocking to museums for guidance and reassurance.

 

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights in Atlanta is one such place.

 

 


The National Center for Civil and Human Rights is commemorating what would have been Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 90th birthday this year with a new permanent installation and new exhibit of drafts and notes and notes from some of Dr. King's most enduring speeches and sermons, including "I Have A Dream." 

Nicole Moore is the manager of education and museum content for the center. She was part of the team that worked to curate this special exhibit called "The Meaning of Hope: The Best of the Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection." The exhibit opens in Atlanta Jan. 19. 


Courtesy National Center for Civil and Human Rights

The National Center for Civil and Human Rights is commemorating what would have been Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 90th birthday this year with a new exhibit of drafts and notes from some of Dr. King's most enduring speeches and sermons, including "I Have A Dream." 

Nicole Moore is the manager of education and museum content for the center. She was part of the team that worked to curate this special exhibit called "The Meaning of Hope: The Best of the Morehouse College Martin Luther King, Jr. Collection." The exhibit opened in Atlanta Jan. 19.