NAACP

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One hundred years ago, Americans were adjusting to life after a destabilizing world war. The Spanish influenza decimated communities, fears of Bolshevik-style communism ran rampant and hundreds of thousands of returning veterans were competing for jobs and housing ⁠— including African Americans confident that fighting abroad earned them the right to freedom at home. 

Throughout the summer of 1919, the war between nations gave way to a war between races. Mobs targeted and lynched black Americans. 


A small group of mostly African American residents from Columbia County gathered in the sanctuary of the Mount Pleasant Baptist Church in Grovetown over the weekend to help organize a new chapter of the NAACP, which bills itself as “the Nation’s Premiere Civil Rights Organization.”


Leighton Rowell / GPB

Town and gown tensions are high at the University of Georgia as the end of the school year nears. Amid national conversations about the historical role of U.S. colleges and universities in slavery, community leaders and a group of faculty are calling on UGA to do more to address its own slave past.

But in a letter to the editor of UGA's student newspaperThe Red & Black, UGA President Jere Morehead said the university had "carefully considered all aspects" of a memorial constructed in 2018 to recognize and honor the legacy of individuals who were enslaved in Athens during the 19th Century.


Today's show featured conversations on racial discrimination in Airbnb bookings and a new book focusing on the strength and spirit of boyhood.

The NAACP is partnering with Airbnb to prevent user bias on the home rental platform. The organization also wants to promote Airbnb as an economic opportunity in communities of color in Atlanta. GPB reporter Ross Terrell followed the story and joined On Second Thought to discuss the partnership.


Eric Risberg / Associated Press

Airbnb has faced various lawsuits and allegations that guests and hosts of color are less likely to successfully book a reservation. A Harvard Business School study in 2016 looked into those claims. The study found that people with African American-sounding names were 16% less likely to be accepted as Airbnb guests.

 

The NAACP is partnering with Airbnb to prevent user bias on the home rental platform. The organization also wants to promote Airbnb as an economic opportunity in communities of color in Atlanta. GPB reporter Ross Terrell followed the story and joined On Second Thought to discuss the partnership.

 


Image from the website of the Norman Rockwell Museum

The 1954 Supreme Court decision Brown v. Board of Education made segregation of America’s public schools illegal. But decades before Thurgood Marshall argued for Linda Brown's right to attend the all-white school closest to her house in Topeka, Kansas, lawsuits brought by little girls and young women chipped away at the foundations of segregated education. New research finds their grassroots efforts paved the way for the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's (NAACP) legal battle to integrate schools nationally. 

 


A state representative from metro Atlanta is spearheading a bill that would create hate crime legislation in Georgia.

Meagan Hanson, a Republican from Brookhaven, announced the bill this morning at the state capitol.

“With this legislation, Georgia will join the vast majority of states in this country prosecuting crimes motivated by hate with the intent to threaten groups of our citizens with the gravity and attention they deserve,” Hanson said during a press conferenc

Ryan McFadin / GPB News

Savannah’s NAACP chapter celebrated its centennial this fall at the historic First African Baptist Church. The church was also honored by the Georgia Historical Society earlier this year for its extensive role in African-American history and the civil rights movement, from hiding people on the underground railroad, to being the site of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s first public speech in 1944. GPB’s Ryan McFadin went to a Sunday service, and sent back an audio postcard.

The NAACP — which at 108 years old must balance both its storied legacy as the nation's oldest civil rights group and the potential for irrelevance amid a fresh wave of racial justice groups born of social media such as Black Lives Matter — decided to shake things up a bit on Saturday.

The organization announced its new president and CEO and its intention to alter its tax status to a non-profit category that permits more aggressive political lobbying.

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Sports has long been known as the great unifier. But in the NFL, this season feels different.  

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