Morehouse College

Morehouse Film Festival/Be Funky Collage Maker

The Morehouse College Human Rights Film Festival aims to spark to conversation using "artivism" — the combination of art and activism. 

Filmmakers Korstiaan Vandiver and Devin “Egypt” Robinson spoke to On Second Thought host Virginia Prescott about the impacts of art and activism in the film industry.  


Little Shop of Stories is bringing best-selling New York Times author Jason Reynolds to Decatur at the Holy Trinity Episcopal Parish on Thursday, Oct. 10 at 7 p.m.  Hear how Reynolds inspires young readers with contemporary stories that deal with real-world issues.


Morehouse College

Oprah Winfrey is making another large donation to one of Atlanta's historic black colleges and universities.

 

Morehouse College is set to receive a $13 million gift from the television icon as part of the 30th anniversary of the Oprah Winfrey Scholars Program.

 

 


student looking at art in a museum
AUC Collective

If you go into an art museum in North America, chances are the staff, the curators and the directors are going to be white.

In 2015, an Andrew W. Mellon Foundation study found 72% of the staff of museums belonging to the Association of Art Museum Directors was non-Hispanic white.

Now, the Atlanta University Center wants to train the next generation of African American art historians and museum curators.


Philanthropist Robert F. Smith speaking at the Morehouse College 2019 commencement ceremony in Atlanta, Ga.
Morehouse College

Graduating seniors at Morehouse College received a surprise gift from billionaire philanthropist Robert Smith who announced he would provide a grant to pay off the sum of student loan debt for the class of 2019. 


Former first lady Michelle Obama makes a surprise visit to Spelman College in Atlanta on Saturday, May 11.
Robert Jimison / GPB

Former first lady Michelle Obama made a surprise visit to Spelman College ahead of a book tour event in Atlanta for her autobiography, "Becoming."

Morehouse Office of Housing and Residential Life / morehouse.edu

The country's only all-male historically black college will begin admitting transgender men next year, marking a major shift for the school at a time when higher education institutions around the nation are adopting more welcoming policies toward LGBT students.

Leaders of Morehouse College in Atlanta told The Associated Press that its board of trustees approved the policy on Saturday.

Screenshot by GPB / YouTube

Morehouse College in Atlanta is one of the nation’s most renowned and distinguished historically black colleges. Tiago Rachelson, who is white, is a student there.


Courtesy of March for Science Atlanta

The National Science Foundation awarded Morehouse College a new $1.5 million grant to increase student recruitment and retention in STEM fields. According to a Pew research study, black and Latinx professionals are underrepresented in STEM careers. Black professionals make up only nine percent of the total STEM workforce.

The grant will go towards a collaborative program with more than 20 HBCUs around the country, led by Morehouse's HBCU Identity Research Center. The program will fund research into enhancing students' resiliency and identies as future scientists.

Lycurgus Muldrow, executive director of the HBCU Identity Research Center, joined "On Second Thought" to discuss the impact of the grant on students across the nation.


Dreadhead Films LLC / Screenshot by GPB

Colleges and universities across Georgia have wrapped up the semester, but one Morehouse College student has more work to do. Last year, Julien Turner took an extra credit biology assignment and turned it into a viral music video about the differences between mitosis and meiosis. The rising junior's video made it all the way to the people who work on "Sesame Street." Now, Julien and his brother are creating an educational music video for the show. Julien spoke with GPB's Leah Fleming about the project.

What does it mean to have an awakening? For Christopher Paul Curtis, it meant finding his calling in his 40s. After working for more than a decade in Detroit's automobile manufacturing industry, Curtis began writing children's books about the African American experience. His 1996 novel "The Watsons Go to Birmingham" earned him a John Newbery Medal, making him the first African American man to win this honor. He won again in 2000 for "Bud, Not Buddy" and in 2008 for "Elijah of Buxton." We spoke with Curtis in 2017. 

Why America Still Needs Thriving HBCUs

Feb 20, 2018
W.A. Harewood / AP Photo

We continue our look at Historically Black Colleges and Universities with Atlanta Journal Constitution reporters Eric Stirgus and Ernie Suggs. They recently rolled out a Re:Race series called “HBCUs: A Threatened Heritage.” The project looks at the enrollment numbers, finances, and the overall future of HBCUs in America.

Left Bank Books

A new book explores why so many young men of color wind up in prison. “Locking Up Our Own: Crime and Punishment in Black America,” is the work of Yale Law School Professor James Forman, Jr. His father was a leader of SNCC -- the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee. Forman, Jr. is a graduate of Atlanta’s Roosevelt High. He joins us in the studio. 

The History And Science Behind Sleep

Oct 4, 2017
Pixabay / Ben Reiss and Chris Ehlen

This week a group of scientists were awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for their discoveries related to our circadian rhythms. Emory University professor Ben Reiss joined us in May to talk about his latest exploration of sleep patterns, “Wild Nights: How Taming Sleep Created Our Restless World.” We revisit that conversation, then we’re joined in the studio by Assistant Professor of Neuroscience for Morehouse School of Medicine, Chris Ehlen.

PBS

As college students make spring break plans, many are still buzzing about President Trump’s new executive order that moves the Initiative for Historically Black Colleges and Universities under the jurisdiction of the White House.

 

 

Trump says the move will help galvanize support for struggling HBCUs. But the details and benefits of the move are still yet to be seen.

 

 

FLICKR

Computer Science students at Morehouse College are working on a project to help save young minority men from incarceration.

They have created a tool that uses visualization technology to help organizations analyze data from more than 200 youth facilities nationwide. The goal is to help these detention centers determine the most effective reform methods so resources can be allocated more efficiently.

 

There are less than 100 female black physicists in the United States. Hadiyah Nicole-Green, of the Morehouse School of Medicine, is one of those few women. And she's on the forefront of a new technology that uses lasers to target and destroy tumors. Professor Green has received a million dollar grant to push her research into clinical trials. 

She joins us to talk more about her medical breakthrough and why her fight against cancer is so personal. 

Sean Powers / On Second Thought

South African attorney Mohamed Keshavjee is the latest recipient of the prestigious Gandhi-King-Ikeda Award for Peace, which is given out at Morehouse College. Past recipients include Rosa Parks, Andrew Young, and Nelson Mandela. Keshavjee talks about his work to help people in impoverished nations settle family disputes outside a courtroom.

Studying Spike Lee | The Black Calhouns | Olympic Preparation

Feb 29, 2016

Filmmaker Spike Lee's large body of work that's earned him a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.  It's also inspired a new curriculum for a class at Morehouse College. Also, the daughter of Lena Horne traces her family history to Atlanta and we talk about the Georgia Track Club's preparations to get several athletes to this summer's Olympic Games.

Full Show - February 25, 2016